Northwest Arts Review: 2 July, 2020

This week, one of long-time leaders of the Inland Northwest arts community, Karen Mobley, pays a visit to talk about her newest creation, a book of poetry. Also, Chris Maccini introduces us to a regional singer-songwriter who took the plunge and entered NPR’s country-wide Tiny Desk Concert competition, and Dan Webster offers his take on a new movie. Music today is a bit of ragtime piano from the Methow Valley’s Bill Hottell.

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Spokane Public Radio is part of the Northwest News Network (N3), a public radio collaboration in Washington, Oregon and Idaho working together to bring more news to our listeners.

Spokane's Covid Count Expands By 70 On Thursday

19 minutes ago
Spokane Regional Health District

The Spokane Regional Health District reported 70 new Covid cases today [Thursday]. It’s the third day in the last four that that figure has been 70 or more.

Health Officer Bob Lutz says people younger than 40 continue to account for a large number of the cases.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Thursday to hear arguments this fall in a case that pits the Trump administration against the House Judiciary Committee and its efforts to see redacted portions of report on Russian interference prepared by special prosecutor Robert Mueller. The decision is a significant blow to House Democrats' efforts to see the material before the November election.

Steven Marson had more than 100 contracts for public fireworks displays, the majority of them scheduled for this weekend, before the pandemic hit Maine and prompted cancellations. Now, he has eight.

Marson, who runs Central Maine Pyrotechnics, says the steep decline in business has cost him about a million dollars so far.

"I could be out of business if this continues into 2021 because I don't have the means to keep going when you have not revenue coming in," he says.

Marson's not alone.

In a year marked by coronavirus fears, a slowing economy and nationwide protests calling for an end to systemic racism, more and more Americans are looking to arm themselves, according to a key government indicator.

The FBI reported that Americans set a new record of 3.9 million background checks to purchase or possess firearms in June. That eclipsed the previous record set in March of 3.7 million background checks.

This week, one of long-time leaders of the Inland Northwest arts community, Karen Mobley, pays a visit to talk about her newest creation, a book of poetry. Also, Chris Maccini introduces us to a regional singer-songwriter who took the plunge and entered NPR’s country-wide Tiny Desk Concert competition, and Dan Webster offers his take on a new movie. Music today is a bit of ragtime piano from the Methow Valley’s Bill Hottell.

If you're traveling this holiday weekend or if you have guests coming your way, there's a good chance you live in a state affected by a mandatory 14-day travel quarantine.

As new COVID-19 hot spots erupt around the country, some public health officials said the measures could help contain the spread. But the rules are a patchwork, and enforcement differs state by state.

Florida's surge of COVID-19 cases shows no signs of slowing down. The state Department of Heath reported Florida set another daily record Thursday, with 10,109 cases, surpassing Saturday's record of 9,585 cases. That brings Florida's total confirmed coronavirus cases to nearly 170,000 and a death toll of 3,617 (with 67 new deaths reported Thursday).

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