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0000017b-f971-ddf0-a17b-fd73f3be0000For 25 years, KPBX Kids' Concerts have brought different genres of music and performances to generations of children. These family concerts are at the heart of the station's mission to provide music awareness and entertainment to our listening region, which compliments our on-air programming.Eight free one-hour concerts are held throughout the year at rotating venues. At each concert, attendees may be treated to a mix of music and historical information. Each KPBX Kids' Concert highlights a musical style. Past concerts have featured classical, jazz, big band, folk, bluegrass, latin, calypso, reggae, klezmer, rockabilly, and lots more.ALL KPBX KIDS' CONCERTS ARE FREE.

KPBX Kids' Concert: Music of the Renaissance Jan. 28

Kids of all ages felt like royalty with music for Kings and Queens at the January 28 KPBX Kids' Concert, held at the castle-like St. John's Cathedral on Spokane's South Hill.

Tim Westerhaus, music director for the cathedral, arranged for a concert of sacred and secular music of the era, specifically composed in the 16th century for the Chapel Royal of Queens Mary and Elizabeth.

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Credit Spokane Public Radio / Janean Jorgensen
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Janean Jorgensen
Several kids came in 'royal' garb.

The cathedral's resident carillonneur, Byrl Cinnamon, began the concert from high atop the bell tower as the Cathedral Kantorei Choir processed in, then sang songs as if they were part of the court of Westminster in London.

Guitarist Paul Grove explored musical romance in the Royal Court, both with solo performance and with soloists from the choir.

Renaissance music, featured heavily in the music program Harmonia (Wednesdays at 7 p.m. on KPBX) doesn't have chord progressions that our modern ears are used to. Instead, composers such as Thomas Tallis and William Byrd wove melodies together, giving us richly-textured music.

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The architecture of St. John's Cathedral borrows from the medieval Gothic style, and details are much like those found in France. Like those buildings from the 14th and 15th centuries, the Cathedral is solely built from rock and glass, no steel used to reinforce the buildings. It's like being in a centuries-old castle! Watch this feature about the building by Public TV KSPS (which is not affiliated with Spokane Public Radio).

Directions to the Cathedral

KPBX Kids' Concerts are free thanks in part to event donors Harvard Park Children's Learning Center North, Numerica Credit Union, Rocket Bakeries, and Pizza Pipeline. Thanks also to Hearn Brothers Printing, the performers, St. John's Cathedral and its staff, and the members and volunteers of SPR.

Members of the Cathedral Kantorei Choir:
Soprano: Stacia Cammarano, Tamara Schupman, Corliss Newman, Kristen Naudett, Andrea Olsen, Sami Schneider.
Alto: Kristina Ploeger, Darnelle Preston, Mariah Priebe, Amanda Rood, Gretchen Ramey, Angelika Wilson-Wipp
Tenor: Tim Kenagy, Cary Boyce, Eric Betz, Brian Soth, Mark Petty, Isaac Robbins
Bass: Jeff Boen, John Frankhauser, Max Mendez, Jackson Steimel, Joshua Vander Plaats, David Wolff

The program for the day:

I. Music for Queens Mary and Elizabeth: The Chapel Royal
A selection of joyful and peaceful music in Latin and English, with the Chapel Royal Choir in formal dress and procession. History of turbulent religion and politics interspersed through music.
Carillonneur, Byrl Cinnamon
Cathedral Kantorei Choir

II. Musical Romance in the Royal Court
Music with guitar and solo voice, and exploring the harpsichord up close.
Paul Grove, guitar
Vocal Soloists
Timothy Westerhaus, harpsichord

III. Courtly Jesting and Playful Madrigals
Playful English Madrigals with percussion and choir in courtly dress. Everyone joins in the fun by learning an English round.
Cathedral Kantorei Choir