Chris Maccini

Program Production Director

Chris grew up in Spokane and has many fond childhood memories of being subjected to the voices of SPR while in the backseat of his parents' car.  After moving to Upstate New York and graduating from Colgate University with a degree in Economics, he spent six years living in Seattle working for non-profit organizations and sailing around the Puget Sound with his wife, Tracie, and their boat-dog, Mollusk. He returned to Spokane to attend graduate school at Eastern Washington University and graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing. 

With Spokane Public Radio as an intern since May 2017 and as an employee since June 2018, helps produce arts and special programming such as "The Bookshelf," "Poetry Moment," "Northwest Arts Review," special features and more. 

Ways to Connect

Brooke Matson is a poet and book artist in Spokane, Washington, where she is the executive director of Spark Central, a non-profit dedicated to igniting creativity, innovation, and imagination. Eight years of teaching and mentoring at-risk youth deepened her study of physical science and the psychological effects of violence and loss. 

Matson's second collection of poetry, In Accelerated Silence, was selected by Mark Doty as winner of the Jake Adam York Prize and has just been published by Milkweed Editions. 

Shawn Vestal’s debut novel, Daredevils, was published in spring 2016 by Penguin Press. His collection of short stories, Godforsaken Idaho, published by New Harvest in April 2013, was named the winner of the PEN/​Robert W. Bingham Prize, which honors a debut book that “represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise.” He also published A.K.A. Charles Abbott, a short memoir, as a Kindle Single in October 2013.

Shawn Vestal’s debut novel, Daredevils, was published in spring 2016 by Penguin Press. His collection of short stories, Godforsaken Idaho, published by New Harvest in April 2013, was named the winner of the PEN/​Robert W. Bingham Prize, which honors a debut book that “represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise.” He also published A.K.A. Charles Abbott, a short memoir, as a Kindle Single in October 2013.

Shawn Vestal’s debut novel, Daredevils, was published in spring 2016 by Penguin Press. His collection of short stories, Godforsaken Idaho, published by New Harvest in April 2013, was named the winner of the PEN/​Robert W. Bingham Prize, which honors a debut book that “represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise.” He also published A.K.A. Charles Abbott, a short memoir, as a Kindle Single in October 2013.

Shawn Vestal’s debut novel, Daredevils, was published in spring 2016 by Penguin Press. His collection of short stories, Godforsaken Idaho, published by New Harvest in April 2013, was named the winner of the PEN/​Robert W. Bingham Prize, which honors a debut book that “represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise.” He also published A.K.A. Charles Abbott, a short memoir, as a Kindle Single in October 2013.

Shawn Vestal’s debut novel, Daredevils, was published in spring 2016 by Penguin Press. His collection of short stories, Godforsaken Idaho, published by New Harvest in April 2013, was named the winner of the PEN/​Robert W. Bingham Prize, which honors a debut book that “represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise.” He also published A.K.A. Charles Abbott, a short memoir, as a Kindle Single in October 2013.

Nicole Sheets’ work has appeared in Image, Bellingham Review, Hotel Amerika, Tampa Review, Western Humanities Review, Rock & Sling, Airplane Reading, and elsewhere. She teaches at Whitworth University and edits How To Pack for Church Camp (howtopackforchurchcamp.com), an online anthology of creative nonfiction about spiritual experiences in the out-of-doors. In Spokane, she lives in a 50s rancher named Cool Ranch; on Twitter, she lives @heynicolesheets

Nicole Sheets’ work has appeared in Image, Bellingham Review, Hotel Amerika, Tampa Review, Western Humanities Review, Rock & Sling, Airplane Reading, and elsewhere. She teaches at Whitworth University and edits How To Pack for Church Camp (howtopackforchurchcamp.com), an online anthology of creative nonfiction about spiritual experiences in the out-of-doors. In Spokane, she lives in a 50s rancher named Cool Ranch; on Twitter, she lives @heynicolesheets

Nicole Sheets’ work has appeared in Image, Bellingham Review, Hotel Amerika, Tampa Review, Western Humanities Review, Rock & Sling, Airplane Reading, and elsewhere. She teaches at Whitworth University and edits How To Pack for Church Camp (howtopackforchurchcamp.com), an online anthology of creative nonfiction about spiritual experiences in the out-of-doors. In Spokane, she lives in a 50s rancher named Cool Ranch; on Twitter, she lives @heynicolesheets

Nicole Sheets’ work has appeared in Image, Bellingham Review, Hotel Amerika, Tampa Review, Western Humanities Review, Rock & Sling, Airplane Reading, and elsewhere. She teaches at Whitworth University and edits How To Pack for Church Camp (howtopackforchurchcamp.com), an online anthology of creative nonfiction about spiritual experiences in the out-of-doors. In Spokane, she lives in a 50s rancher named Cool Ranch; on Twitter, she lives @heynicolesheets

Nicole Sheets’ work has appeared in Image, Bellingham Review, Hotel Amerika, Tampa Review, Western Humanities Review, Rock & Sling, Airplane Reading, and elsewhere. She teaches at Whitworth University and edits How To Pack for Church Camp (howtopackforchurchcamp.com), an online anthology of creative nonfiction about spiritual experiences in the out-of-doors. In Spokane, she lives in a 50s rancher named Cool Ranch; on Twitter, she lives @heynicolesheets

Susanne Griepp, raised in southern California, has lived in eastern Washington since 1977. She's been a singer, shopkeeper, waitress, nurseryman, florist, landlady and para-educator. She lives with her husband, Winston, of 44 years, in Chewelah just west of Quartzite Mountain. A member of the Creekside Writers since 2011, she's been a community Arts and Humanities advocate for over twenty years.

Susanne Griepp, raised in southern California, has lived in eastern Washington since 1977. She's been a singer, shopkeeper, waitress, nurseryman, florist, landlady and para-educator. She lives with her husband, Winston, of 44 years, in Chewelah just west of Quartzite Mountain. A member of the Creekside Writers since 2011, she's been a community Arts and Humanities advocate for over twenty years.

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

Susanne Griepp, raised in southern California, has lived in eastern Washington since 1977. She's been a singer, shopkeeper, waitress, nurseryman, florist, landlady and para-educator. She lives with her husband, Winston, of 44 years, in Chewelah just west of Quartzite Mountain. A member of the Creekside Writers since 2011, she's been a community Arts and Humanities advocate for over twenty years.

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

Susanne Griepp, raised in southern California, has lived in eastern Washington since 1977. She's been a singer, shopkeeper, waitress, nurseryman, florist, landlady and para-educator. She lives with her husband, Winston, of 44 years, in Chewelah just west of Quartzite Mountain. A member of the Creekside Writers since 2011, she's been a community Arts and Humanities advocate for over twenty years.

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

Susanne Griepp, raised in southern California, has lived in eastern Washington since 1977. She's been a singer, shopkeeper, waitress, nurseryman, florist, landlady and para-educator. She lives with her husband, Winston, of 44 years, in Chewelah just west of Quartzite Mountain. A member of the Creekside Writers since 2011, she's been a community Arts and Humanities advocate for over twenty years.

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

Pivot Spokane is a live storytelling event hosted quarterly. This event was recorded live on February 6, 2020. The theme of the evening was "Hooked."

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

Jennifer Jussel is a first-year MFA student studying Creative Nonfiction at Eastern Washington University, where she also teaches undergraduate composition. She received her Bachelor’s in English and Creative Writing from Trinity University. She has been published most recently in High Noon, The Contemporary, The Same, Awakenings, The Tipton, and The Trinity Review. 

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

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