Chris Maccini

Program Production Director

Chris grew up in Spokane and has many fond childhood memories of being subjected to the voices of SPR while in the backseat of his parents' car.  After moving to Upstate New York and graduating from Colgate University with a degree in Economics, he spent six years living in Seattle working for non-profit organizations and sailing around the Puget Sound with his wife, Tracie, and their boat-dog, Mollusk. He returned to Spokane to attend graduate school at Eastern Washington University and graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing. 

With Spokane Public Radio as an intern since May 2017 and as an employee since June 2018, helps produce arts and special programming such as "The Bookshelf," "Poetry Moment," "Northwest Arts Review," special features and more. 

Ways to Connect

photo by Grace June (2019)

Erin Pringle is the author of a novel, Hezada! I Miss You (forthcoming Awst Press, 2020) and two short story collections, The Whole World at Once (West Virginia University Press/Vandalia Press 2017) and The Floating Order (Two Ravens Press, 2009). She has written three chapbooks: "How The Sun Burns Among Hills of Rock and Pebble" (The Head and The Hand Press, Philadelphia/2015); "The Lightning Tree" (Underground Voices, 2015); and "The Wandering House" (Awst Press, Austin/2016).

Jennifer Jussel is a first-year MFA student studying Creative Nonfiction at Eastern Washington University, where she also teaches undergraduate composition. She received her Bachelor’s in English and Creative Writing from Trinity University. She has been published most recently in High Noon, The Contemporary, The Same, Awakenings, The Tipton, and The Trinity Review. 

This classic adventure story was the first novel published by H.G. Wells, considered by many to be the father of science fiction. First serialized in The New Review in 1895, The Time Machine is credited with popularizing the concept of time travel.

Join Tom Lee as he reads this exciting story for The Bookshelf.

Jennifer Jussel is a first-year MFA student studying Creative Nonfiction at Eastern Washington University, where she also teaches undergraduate composition. She received her Bachelor’s in English and Creative Writing from Trinity University. She has been published most recently in High Noon, The Contemporary, The Same, Awakenings, The Tipton, and The Trinity Review. 

Jennifer Jussel is a first-year MFA student studying Creative Nonfiction at Eastern Washington University, where she also teaches undergraduate composition. She received her Bachelor’s in English and Creative Writing from Trinity University. She has been published most recently in High Noon, The Contemporary, The Same, Awakenings, The Tipton, and The Trinity Review. 

Jennifer Jussel is a first-year MFA student studying Creative Nonfiction at Eastern Washington University, where she also teaches undergraduate composition. She received her Bachelor’s in English and Creative Writing from Trinity University. She has been published most recently in High Noon, The Contemporary, The Same, Awakenings, The Tipton, and The Trinity Review. 

Keelin Elizabeth Photography


  Many high schoolers compete in sports, and others square off in debate or knowledge bowl. But each year, the Downtown Spokane Public Library and Spokane Arts host a more unusual competition for high school students.

Nancy Roth was a long-time staff member at Spokane Public Radio and former host of The Bookshelf. Her voice is still heard on the SPR airwaves from time to time on The Bookshelf and Men in Charge.

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

Nancy Roth was a long-time staff member at Spokane Public Radio and former host of The Bookshelf. Her voice is still heard on the SPR airwaves from time to time on The Bookshelf and Men in Charge.

Nancy Roth was a long-time staff member at Spokane Public Radio and former host of The Bookshelf. Her voice is still heard on the SPR airwaves from time to time on The Bookshelf and Men in Charge.

Nancy Roth was a long-time staff member at Spokane Public Radio and former host of The Bookshelf. Her voice is still heard on the SPR airwaves from time to time on The Bookshelf and Men in Charge.

Nancy Roth was a long-time staff member at Spokane Public Radio and former host of The Bookshelf. Her voice is still heard on the SPR airwaves from time to time on The Bookshelf and Men in Charge.

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

The Pied Piper was one of the first locally produced programs ever aired on Spokane Public Radio. It made its debut in 1980, the same year SPR went on the air. The Pied Piper was concieved as an "imaginative family listening" program. Episodes featured storytelling, music, poetry, and more.

Stay tuned as SPR celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2020. We'll be showcasing programs from the archives all year long.

Misty and Hope Shipman-Ellingburg are indigenous writers and producers from Spokane. Enrolled members of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe, they began writing and producing for film in 2015. Through the last four years, they have honed their skills, co-writing and producing two short films, BLOODHOUND and PIXEL. Their SAGA award will support production of their new film, TIGER LILY IS MY LITTLE SISTER, which wants to answer the question: “What does a modern Salish story look like?” as they address themes surrounding Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women.

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

Published in 1895, “Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses was written as a satire and criticism of the writings of fellow American author, James Fenimore Cooper. The essay claims Cooper is guilty of verbose writing, poor plotting, glaring inconsistencies, overused clichés, cardboard characterizations, and a host of similar "offenses."

"How I Edited an Agricultural Paper" was originally published in Mark Twain's 1875 collection of short stories, Sketches New and Old

"Luck" was first published in 1891 in Harper's Magazine. It was subsequently reprinted in 1892 in the anthology Merry Tales.

"Something About Repentence" is taken from Letters from the Earth, which was written circa 1909 and published posthumously in 1962.

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

Published in 1880, A Tramp Abroad details a journey by Mark Twain, with his friend Harris (a character created for the book, and based on his closest friend, Joseph Twichell), through central and southern Europe.

Roughing It follows the travels of young Mark Twain through the Wild West during the years 1861–1867. It was published in 1872.

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

The Senate is holding a trial on the impeachment of President Trump, who is accused by the U.S. House of abusing his power and obstructing Congress. Each day of the trial will stream through this player as proceedings begin. At the conclusion of the trial, senators are expected to vote on whether Trump should be removed from office.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Published in 1885, “The Private History of a Campaign that Failed” is a highly fictionalized memoir of Mark Twain's two-week stint in the pro-Confederate Missouri State Guard.

Also in this episode is "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," which was Twain's first great success as a writer and brought him national attention upon its publication in 1865.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Published in 1885, “The Private History of a Campaign that Failed” is a highly fictionalized memoir of Mark Twain's two-week stint in the pro-Confederate Missouri State Guard.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Old Times on the Mississippi was originally published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875. In these stories, Twain tells of his experience working on riverboats on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi was later incorporated in to Twain's larger work, Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883.

Tom Bacon reads these classic Mark Twain tales for The Bookshelf.

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