Sunday Puzzle: Accented Syllable

Aug 8, 2021
Originally published on August 8, 2021 10:21 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a word, name, or phrase ending on the accented syllable "lay" — in any spelling.

Ex. French city overlooking the Strait of Dover --> CALAIS
1. Person who parks cars at a restaurant
2. Slice of boneless meat or fish
3. Lose by putting in a place you can't remember
4. Put to rest, as fears
5. French red wine
6. Cry at a bullfight
7. Brand of skin cream and beauty products
8. French for "with milk" (2 wds.)
9. French for "sun"
10. Skiers' cabin in the Alps
11. Poet Edna St. Vincent
12. [Fill in the blank:] Crème ___ (custard dessert)
13. Car with a roof that folds down
14. Renaissance writer François
15. Singer Robert who won a Tony for his role in "The Happy Time"
16. "Swan Lake," for example

Last week's challenge: It comes from listener Chad Graham, of Philadelphia. Think of a common Britishism — a word that the British use that's not common in the U.S. Write it in all capital letters. Turn it upside-down (that is, rotate it 180 degrees). The result is a famous hero of books and movies. Who is it?

Challenge answer: LOO — 007

Winner: Jerry Cordaro of Cleveland, Ohio.

This week's challenge: It comes from listener Ed Pegg Jr. Think of something that gets people moving vertically. Remove the middle two letters, and you get something that moves people horizontally. What two things are these?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here by Thursday, Aug. 12, at 3 p.m. ET. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you.

: 8/08/21

In this week's puzzle with Will Shortz, the clue "Singer Robert who won a Tony for his role in 'Camelot'," should have read "Singer Robert who won a Tony for his role in 'The Happy Time'."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S very own puzzlemaster. Hello, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Hello, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yeah, it came from listener Chad Graham of Philadelphia. I said think of a common Britishism - a word that the British use that's not common in the U.S. I said write it in all capital letters, turn it upside down, and the result is a famous hero of books and movies. Who is it? Well, that answer is LOO, L-O-O, as in the British term for the facilities. Turn it upside down, you get double 007.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: The LOO AND 007. I love it. We had over 500 correct responses from Anglophiles. And the winner is Jerry Cordaro of Cleveland, Ohio. Congratulations, and welcome to the program.

JERRY CORDARO: Thank you, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How did you figure it out?

CORDARO: Well, I made a list of all the letters when you'd flip them over and kept going through. I couldn't figure it out. I couldn't figure it out and then happened to glance at L and went - turn that over. That's a seven. Oh, there we go.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Are you an Anglophile?

CORDARO: I am an Anglophile. I'm also a word nerd.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So you are a word nerd. Is this your first run-in with Will?

CORDARO: No, actually, I have gone to the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament several times. And actually, because of Will, this would complete my trifecta. One year, I was in the movie "Wordplay".

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Uh-huh.

CORDARO: And in 2009, I was one of the winners in Group C, so I appeared on the episode of "Dinner: Impossible", which gave me television. And now, thanks to Will again, I've got radio, which is my trifecta...

(LAUGHTER)

CORDARO: ...Or prefecta (ph) if you count the Internet.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Whoo - here we go. Oh, my goodness. All right. The stakes are very high. Are you ready to play, Jerry?

CORDARO: Sure.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right. Jerry, I knew I recognized your name. Nice to have you on the program. Every answer today is a word, name or phrase ending in the accented syllable lay (ph) in any spelling. For example, if I said French city overlooking the Strait of Dover, you would say Calais. Here's number one. A person who parks cars at a restaurant.

CORDARO: Valet.

SHORTZ: That's it. Slice of boneless meat or fish.

CORDARO: Fillet.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Lose by putting in a place you can't remember.

CORDARO: Mislay.

SHORTZ: That's it. Put to rest, as fears.

CORDARO: Allay.

SHORTZ: That's it. A French red wine.

CORDARO: Oh, I don't know wines.

SHORTZ: Yeah, you'd know this one - starts with a B.

CORDARO: B - Beaujolais?

SHORTZ: Beaujolais is it. Cry at a bullfight.

CORDARO: Ole.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. A brand of skin cream and beauty products.

CORDARO: Olay.

SHORTZ: That's also Olay. French for with milk. Two words.

CORDARO: Au lait.

SHORTZ: Au lait - that's the third o-lay (ph).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I see what you did there.

SHORTZ: (Laughter) French for sun, S-U-N.

CORDARO: Soleil.

SHORTZ: That's it. A skier's cabin in the Alps.

CORDARO: Chalet.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Poet Edna St. Vincent.

CORDARO: Millay.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Fill in the blank - creme blank. That's C-R-E-M-E blank. It's a custard dessert.

CORDARO: Brulee.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. A car with a roof that folds down.

CORDARO: A roof that folds down. I'm stuck on convertible.

SHORTZ: Starts with a C. Starts with C-A.

CORDARO: Cabriolet?

SHORTZ: Cabriolet is it - good. Renaissance writer Francois.

CORDARO: Francois...

SHORTZ: Starts with an R.

CORDARO: I'm not getting this one.

SHORTZ: That's a tough one. It's Rabelais, R-A-B-E-L-A-I-S, Francois Rabelais. How about singer Robert who won a Tony for his role in "Camelot"?

CORDARO: Goulet.

SHORTZ: Goulet - good. And your last one is "Swan Lake," for example.

CORDARO: Ballet.

SHORTZ: Ballet - nice work.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did great. How do you feel?

CORDARO: Wonderful.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That was a long pause there. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Jerry, which member station do you listen to?

CORDARO: I am a sustaining member of WCPN Ideastream Public Media.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Jerry Cordaro of Cleveland, Ohio., Thank you so much for playing the puzzle.

CORDARO: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, what is next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah, it comes from listener Ed Pegg, Jr. Think of something that gets people moving vertically. Remove the middle two letters, and you get something that moves people horizontally. What two things are these? So, again, something that gets people moving vertically. Remove the middle two letters, and you get something that moves people horizontally. What two things are these?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, August 12 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time, and if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And if you pick up the phone, you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.