Sunday Puzzle: D'oh!

Jun 16, 2019

On-air challenge: Every answer is a six-letter word or name ending in the letters D-O.

Example: Gilbert and Sullivan opera, with "The" --> MIKADO

1. Black-and-white outfit worn to a fancy party

2. Sexual drive

3. Oddball

4. Kind of dragon

5. Brand of swim trunks

6. Brand of luxury watches

7. Texas city on the Mexican border

8. Fourth-largest city of Ohio

9. Actor who starred in "The Godfather"

10. Spanish for Saturday

11. Spanish for "when"

12. Prefix meaning "fake"

13. Proportion of light reflected by the surface of a moon or planet

14. Square dance move (hyph.)

Last week's challenge: This challenge came from listener Judy Grant of Chapel Hill, N.C. Think of a famous actor, first and last names, that together contain each of the five vowels (A, E, I, O, and U) exactly once. Add an M and rearrange the result to get a famous writer, also first and last names. Who are these famous people?

Challenge answer: Len Cariou --> Alice Munro

Winner: Robert Wemischner of Los Angeles.

This week's challenge: Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. The two words rhyme, respectively, with the first and last names of a famous singer. What city is it, and who's the singer?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, June 20, at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Hey, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: What was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Judy Grant of Chapel Hill, N.C. I said think of a famous actor - first and last names - that together contain each of the five vowels, A, E, I, O and U, exactly once. And if you add an M and rearrange the result, you get a famous writer, also first and last names. Who are these famous people? And the answer is Len Cariou - C-A-R-I-O-U. And you rearrange those letters, you get Alice Monroe.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That was a really hard one. We received only 108 answers. And among those answers is our winner. And it is Robert Wemischner of Los Angeles, Calif.

Congratulations.

ROBERT WEMISCHNER: Thank you. This is so exciting.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So how did you figure that out? Because it was a tough one.

WEMISCHNER: Yeah. Well, you know, it happens to be that Alice Monroe is a favorite author of mine. I do have a lot of the books. And so I went through my library books and, you know, looking at the spines and finding names, you know, and then sort of working backwards. You know, I mean, so once I got her, then, of course, remove the M and went to Len so (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's good. That's great. What do you do?

WEMISCHNER: I am a pastry chef, and I teach baking at a community college in Los Angeles. And I also write about food. I've written four books and use them in my teaching.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's fantastic. What kind of - what kind of desserts do you most focus on?

WEMISCHNER: Well, I love to do plated desserts. So I'm really, you know, teaching kind of contemporary restaurant-style, multi-component desserts. And that is - that's my focus. And so I challenge the students to explore deeply into their creativity and come up with something once they've learned the basics, of course.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) That sounds great. I am a terrible dessert maker. My favorite show is "Nailed It!" where you have all the terrible cooks that actually come on and try and emulate people like you. That's me.

WEMISCHNER: Yeah, that's fun. It is fun.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yeah. All right, are you ready to play The Puzzle?

WEMISCHNER: I sure am.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Robert, today's puzzle is called D'oh. Every answer is a six-letter word or name ending in the letters D-O. For example...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Did you know that he was going to be a pastry chef? Because it feels like that's right on the nose.

SHORTZ: D-O-U-G-H.

(LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: Good. I like that. For example, if I said Gilbert and Sullivan opera with the, you would say "Mikado."

WEMISCHNER: Right.

SHORTZ: Number one, black and white outfit worn to a fancy party.

WEMISCHNER: Black and white outfit worn to a fancy party.

SHORTZ: Usually by men, although women can wear this, too.

WEMISCHNER: Tuxedo.

SHORTZ: A tuxedo is right. Number two is sexual drive.

WEMISCHNER: Libido.

SHORTZ: Right. An oddball.

WEMISCHNER: Weirdo.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. A kind of dragon.

WEMISCHNER: A kind of - oh, Komodo.

SHORTZ: Good. A brand of swim trunks.

WEMISCHNER: Speedo.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. A brand of luxury watches.

WEMISCHNER: Movado.

SHORTZ: Nice. Texas city on the Mexican border.

WEMISCHNER: Laredo.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. The fourth-largest city of Ohio.

WEMISCHNER: Toledo.

SHORTZ: Good. Actor who starred in "The Godfather."

WEMISCHNER: Marlon Brando.

SHORTZ: Nice. Spanish for Saturday.

WEMISCHNER: Sabado.

SHORTZ: Is it Sabato (ph) or Sabado?

WEMISCHNER: Sabado.

SHORTZ: Good.

WEMISCHNER: Yeah, Sabado. Pardon my pronunciation (laughter).

SHORTZ: Spanish for when.

WEMISCHNER: Cuando.

SHORTZ: Nice. Prefix meaning fake.

WEMISCHNER: Pseudo.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Here's a vocabulary tester. Proportion of light reflected by the surface of a moon or planet.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Bonus points for this one, my dear, because this is hard.

WEMISCHNER: Oh, it is. I doubt - I hope so. I should know this, although I'm not in the science side at all other than in baking. So repeat again. Can you? Would you?

SHORTZ: Yeah.

WEMISCHNER: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Proportion of light reflected by the surface of a moon or planet. I'll give you a hint. It starts with A.

WEMISCHNER: It's not albedo - A-L-B-E-D-O.

SHORTZ: That's exactly it. It's pronounced albedo but...

WEMISCHNER: (Laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wow. Extra credit points.

SHORTZ: Add your last one is a hyphenated word for a square dance move.

WEMISCHNER: Do-si-do.

SHORTZ: Do-si-do is it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That was great.

WEMISCHNER: Thank you. Thank you. So much fun.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did really well. How do you feel?

WEMISCHNER: (Laughter) I feel fantastic.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You should. You did really well. And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And what member station do you listen to, Robert?

WEMISCHNER: I listen to KCRW.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Robert Wemischner of Los Angeles, Calif. Thank you for playing The Puzzle.

WEMISCHNER: Thank you so much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, next week's challenge, what is it?

SHORTZ: Yes, name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. The two words rhyme, respectively, with the first and last names of a famous singer. What city is it? And who's the singer? So again, a major U.S. city, more than 100,000 people, two-word name. The two words rhyme respectively with the first and last names of a famous singer. What's the city? And who's the singer?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle and click on the submit your answer link. Remember; just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, June 20 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.