archaeology

Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

The Pacific Northwest is rightfully proud of its thriving microbrewery scene. Most beer lovers probably consider the rise of craft brewing a phenomenon of the past few decades. But the first brewpubs in the Northwest date so far back that archaeologists were called in to excavate the remnants of one in Jacksonville, Oregon.

Courtesy of Polly Bemis Ranch

This summer, Idahoans celebrated the life of one of the state’s most famous Chinese-American citizens. Polly Bemis now has her own statue in Boise.

For those not familiar with her story, Bemis came to the U.S. in the early 1870s. It was a time when many Chinese men were coming to the States to find work, in the mines or wherever else they could.

Courtesy of University of Idaho

Anthropologists from the University of Idaho and 16 students yesterday wrapped up a two-week archaeological dig on the North Idaho College campus in Coeur d’Alene.

It was led by U of I Anthropology Professors Katrina Eichner and Mark Warner.

“It’s kind of looking to see if there is evidence of Fort Sherman that has been in the area, if there’s still existing evidence of Fort Sherman in the places we’re testing or if it’s been chewed up," Warner said.