Classical Music

Symphony Week continues with Verne Windham's conversations with SSO Music Director James Lowe, Education Manager Alexandra Rannow and Symphony Chorale Director Kristina Ploeger-Heckmatpanah. In-studio with us is Symphony percussionist Bryan Bogue who also talks with Verne and performs a pair of short pieces on vibraphone.

Tuesday of Symphony Week 2021 brings us a conversation with Spokane Symphony Conductor Laureate Eckart Preu. Also, from our studio, Syphony cellist Helen Byrne and husband, Symphony tubist Leonard Byrne talk with Verne Windham and play a two-part invention from living African-American composer, Adolphus Hailstork.

Symphony Week at Spokane Public Radio continues with a preview from another Montana orchestra featured previously on Concert of the Week. The new Bozeman Symphony season, the first planned by new Music Director Norman Huynh, debuts the 25th and 26th of September at Bozeman's Willson Auditorium. Here's Jim Tevenan's conversation with Nroman Huynh, puncutated by the music of Johannes Brahms, played in January 2020 by the orchestra.

As part of Symphony Week at Spokane Public Radio, we travel virtually to Montana to check out the new seasons of orchestras featured on our Concert of the Week broadcasts. John Zoltek, Music Director of the Glacier Symphony Orchestra and Chorale tells about GSC's upcoming season, and about a new piece for cello and orchestra by Maestro Zoltek that debuts this fall. More information about the orchestra, chorale and their season is at glaciersymphony.org.

Summer music festivals, those great opportunities to experience favorite sounds and hear new potential favorites in relaxed settings and frequently outdoors, were an early casualty of the COVID pandemic. In 2020 performances were few and almost entirely virtual. 2021, however, is a year of resurrection and rebirth for these events that are an essential part of the art music world’s chemistry.

Summer music festivals, those great opportunities to experience favorite sounds and hear new potential favorites in relaxed settings and frequently outdoors, were an early casualty of the COVID pandemic. In 2020 performances were few and almost entirely virtual. 2021, however, is a year of resurrection and rebirth for these events that are an essential part of the art music world’s chemistry.

This is a two-part preview of regional programs: the Flathead Valley’s Festival Amadeus, and, along the Clark Fork River, the Montana Baroque Music Festival. We begin

We welcomed Inland Northwest Opera's General Director Dawn Wolski and prinicpals in this weekend's INO production of G.B.Pergolesi's The Maid Turned Mistress, Heather and Derrick Parker, to our KPBX studio for music and conversation. Joining them was pianist for the production, Mary J. Trotter. In addition to hearing a performance of two duets from the show, we talked about opera, this production, the challenges INO faced during the pandemic, and how the company has adapted to new realities.

Northwest Arts Review is just about done packing in preparation for its first vacation in three years, but we're not going anywhere until we welcome Cheryl Coughlin of the Wallowa Valley’s Josephy Center with truly exciting news about that great cultural resource. Plus, a Nathan Weinbender review and a few musical and music-related gems from our first season, including a nugget of wisdom from pianist Stephen Hough and a return visit to a unique Inland Northwest performance space courtesy of flutist Alicia Mielke.  

Today, Chris Maccini welcomes Trent Reedy and Jawad Arash, two writers from opposite sides of the globe who are collaborators on a new young adult novel, Enduring Freedom. Dan Webster reviews Without Remorse, the latest Tom Clancy screen adaptation, and we have music from the Girges family, performers in our latest Kids’ Concert.

We recently featured the Grammy-winning Naxos release, The Passion of Yeshua, a contemporary take on a classic form by American composer Richard Danielpour. Assisting us was conductor JoAnn Falletta, who shared with us her insights on the piece. This is the full interview, with brief musical samples.

Opus 12 of Music That Matters remembers a pioneering concert artist and legendary teacher, Camilla Wicks. As a female musician she shone as a brilliant performer while breaking barriers, clearing the way for the current generation of women in music. As teacher she offered not only instruction in technique and interpretation, but also insights into music and the people who make it.

This week, String Orchestra of the Rockies Artistic Director Maria Larionoff joins us with the good news about the orchestra’s new season, which starts this weekend with live performances in Missoula. Chris Maccini introduces us to author Vanessa Vaselka and her new novel, The Great Offshore Grounds. Nathan Weinbender drops by with his take on a new Netflix offering, Project Power, and we’ll enjoy a bit of flute and piano music from our performance studio archive, played by Jennifer Slaughter and Melody Puller

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Margaret May Saunders Ott was a legendary Spokane area pianist and piano teacher whose students have enjoyed careers in performance and music education. Several of them have recorded tributes to Margie May, both playing and reminiscing. We'll hear Jody Graves, Greg Presley, Scott Rednour, Steve Drury, Phil Aaberg, and Mrs. Ott herself.

This week, Chris Maccini introduces us to Carter Hudson, another NPR Tiny Desk Contest entrant from the Inland Northwest, also we meet the Bozeman Symphony Orchestra Music Director-elect, Norman Huynh

, and hear a Dan Webster movie review. Music in and out is from a Bozeman Symphony Orchestra concert conducted by Norman Huynh last December.

These days, we're all adapting to COVID-19 realities, artists and arts entities included. Two stories of change and adaptation are featured on this week's NWAR: A tale of a unique way of keeping visual art alive in the Spokane area that seems to be morphing into a new tradition called Art on the Go, and the story of a philosophical approach to the cancellation of a popular music festival that springs from a musical metaphor--the Grand Pause.

This week on Northwest Arts Review we'll learn about how two significant arts organizations are both coping with current pandemic realities and planning for an uncertain future as we hear from Blair Williams from Coeur d'Alene's The Art Spirit Gallery and Emily Paris-Martin from the Bozeman Symphony Orchestra. Also, we'll have a chance to learn a bit about the connection of art and Native American culture from Terry Cross, Founding Executive Director and current Senior Advisor of the National Indian Child Welfare Association.

Pianist Peggy Reich visited our KPBX studio to discuss her new program, "Music, the Speech of Angels," that she presents this week in various north Idaho locations. She illustrates her conversation with Jim Tevenan around the topic of musical aesthetics with selections from the music used in her programs.

Sheku Kanneh-Mason talks with Jim Tevenan about his new Decca album. Sheku is a young man with great technical prowess and an understanding of the music he plays much beyond his years. 

Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review

 

SPR hosts a table at the Fall Arts Preview before the Spokane Symphony's free Labor Day Concert on Monday, September 2, 2019, from 4-7 p.m. in Comstock Park. Stop by to say hello and enter to win some free tickets to an upcoming event!  

SPR staff, board members, and volunteers love meeting with visitors and talking about what's coming up on the air, events, and our ongoing news and arts coverage.

Performers: Kylie Pribus, Andrew Peltonen, Amanda Nguyen, Cascadde Donally

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