culture issues

At a Monday night rally in downtown Spokane, members of the city's black community said they want to put former NAACP president Rachel Dolezal behind them.

Former NAACP official Rachel Dolezal shared her views on race — including her own — in a live interview Tuesday, the first time she's spoken with the media since reports emerged that questioned her racial identity.

When the Today show's Matt Lauer asked, "Are you an African-American woman?" Dolezal replied, "I identify as black."

Rachel Dolezal, the controversial head of the Spokane chapter of the NAACP, announced Monday she’s stepping down from her post.

Last week, we rounded up a few thoughtful remarks on Rachel Dolezal, the white woman and head of the Spokane, Wash., NAACP chapter who publicly passed herself off as a black woman.

Rachel Dolezal, whose story sparked a national conversation over racial identity, is stepping down as the president of the Spokane chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

In a message to the organization's executive committee, Dolezal said her resignation is in the best interest of the NAACP.

Meeting Where Dolezal Expected To Speak Now Postponed

Jun 15, 2015

A planned meeting Monday where Spokane NAACP president Rachel Dolezal was supposed to give an explanation to members has been postponed.

Spokane NAACP Stands By Dolezal, Waits For Explanation

Jun 12, 2015

The NAACP is standing behind the besieged president of the Spokane chapter, at least for the time being.

In a bizarre turn of events, a prominent civil rights leader and Africana studies professor in Spokane, Wash., has been accused of pretending to be black for personal gain.

Is the leader of Spokane's chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People black?

Race and Police group
Paige Browning / Spokane Public Radio

Spokane police have reacted quickly to a new report that shows racial disproportion in the rate of arrests. The police department (SPD) and the city’s multicultural affairs committee have formed a work-group to address why people of color are arrested at higher rates.

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