Northwest Arts Review

Last week, we brought you the story of Coeur d’Alene musician Jackson Roltgen and his submission to this year’s NPR Tiny Desk Contest. This week, Spokane Public Radio’s Chris Maccini talks with another young musician, this time from Spokane, who also submitted a video for the national contest.

Watch Carter Hudson's full YouTube video submission here.

Brooke Matson is a poet and book artist in Spokane, Washington, where she is the executive director of Spark Central, a non-profit dedicated to igniting creativity, innovation, and imagination. Eight years of teaching and mentoring at-risk youth deepened her study of physical science and the psychological effects of violence and loss. 

Matson's second collection of poetry, In Accelerated Silence, was selected by Mark Doty as winner of the Jake Adam York Prize and has just been published by Milkweed Editions. 

photo by Grace June (2019)

Erin Pringle is the author of a novel, Hezada! I Miss You (forthcoming Awst Press, 2020) and two short story collections, The Whole World at Once (West Virginia University Press/Vandalia Press 2017) and The Floating Order (Two Ravens Press, 2009). She has written three chapbooks: "How The Sun Burns Among Hills of Rock and Pebble" (The Head and The Hand Press, Philadelphia/2015); "The Lightning Tree" (Underground Voices, 2015); and "The Wandering House" (Awst Press, Austin/2016).

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

Misty and Hope Shipman-Ellingburg are indigenous writers and producers from Spokane. Enrolled members of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe, they began writing and producing for film in 2015. Through the last four years, they have honed their skills, co-writing and producing two short films, BLOODHOUND and PIXEL. Their SAGA award will support production of their new film, TIGER LILY IS MY LITTLE SISTER, which wants to answer the question: “What does a modern Salish story look like?” as they address themes surrounding Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women.


Brian Deemy from Spokane Tintype Studio has recieved a Spokane Arts Grant Award, which will allow him to offer classes here in spokane where students and subjects will be able to step through a time capsule, sit in front of a 115 year old camera, and see their image reflected in a process dating back to the Civil War.

Chris Maccini

For nearly ten years, Spokane Youth Ballet (SYB) has provided performance opportunities to dance students in the Spokane area by producing professional-level ballets starring local dancers. With SAGA support, SYB will be expanding its mission of promoting the art of dance by taking ballet into local schools.

Beginning Monday, January 13, 2020 and showing monthly through Monday, June 8, The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture -hosts a series of award-winning independent documentary films at the Magic Lantern in downtown Spokane. All films begin at 7PM and are followed by a discussion or panel with the audience and special guests. Tickets are $8.

With support from SAGA, Scablands Books will publish a graphic novel, Baby Speaks Salish, by local writer Emma Noyes. Proceeds will go to the Salish School of Spokane, which is dedicated to keeping the interior Salish languages alive in the face of ongoing colonialism.

Christopher Boucher is the author of the widely praised novels Golden Delicious and How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive. Boucher teaches literature and writing at Boston college and is editor the literary magazine Post Road. He was in Spokane as part of Eastern Washington University Visiting Writers Series.


November is National Native American Heritage Month, and the downtown branch of the Spokane Public Library is featuring an exhibit by local photographer Robert Charloe which showcases decades of his work exploring the experience of American Indians in the northwest and beyond.

Dean Davis

Christopher Howell is the author of twelve collections of poetry including Love’s Last Number, Gaze, and most recently, The Grief of a Happy Life, just released by University of Washington Press. Howell has received numerous awards including the Washington State Governor’s Award, the Washington State Book Award, two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and three Pushcart Prizes. Locally, he is known as a faculty member in Eastern Washington University’s Master of Fine Arts program as well as director of Willow Springs Books and Lynx House Press.

Gordon S. Jackson, is the author of the new novel, Never Say Moist at Wyndover College. Jackson taught journalism at Whitworth University for more than 30 years. He grew up in South Africa during the apartheid era, encountering the sensorship that subsequently promted him to promote free expression in the classroom and in his writing. Never Say Moist at Wyndover College is Jackson’s fourteenth book, and his second novel. 

orphanwisdom.com

Stephen Jenkinson is an activist, teacher, author, social worker, farmer, and founder of the Orphan Wisdom School. He is also the host of A Night of Grief & Mystery, a musical, poetic, ceremonial evening which he describes as “devoted to the ragged mysteries of being human.” The tour will be in Spokane on Wednesday, November 13th, 7 p.m. at the Bing Crosby Theater. Jenkinson joined Chris Maccini via phone to talk about his work and upcoming performance.

TEDx Spokane will take place on Saturday, October 26th, beginning at 9 a.m. at the Bing Crosby Theater in downtown Spokane. This year's event will feature educators, authors, poets, morticians, community advocates, non-profit administrators, and more. 

Event founder Jaime Tender talked with SPR's Chris Maccini about the origins of the event, and two of this year's performers, Spokane Poet Laureate Mark Anderson, and musician Karli Ingersoll gave a preview of their TED Talks.

Tickets and details about the event can be found at TEDxSpokane.com.

Nicholas Decaro is an artist, student at Whitworth University, and founder of Apostrophe Spokane Art Collective which exhibits LGBTQ+ students, students of color, and women artists from six local universities. Apostrophe Spokane is the recipient of a Spokane Arts Grant Award for their upcoming second annual exhibit of curated student artwork. 

The exhibition will run from April 3 to 12, 2020 with work by student artists from Whitworth University, Spokane Falls Community College, Gonzaga University, Eastern Washington University, North Idaho College, and Washington State University. More information about Apostrophe Spokane can be found on their Facebook page

SPR | Chris Maccini

 


Now in its twelfth year, Terrain has become a signature arts event for the Inland Northwest. This year’s annual showcase will feature close to 300 artists, musicians, and performers on display at the Jensen Byrd Building in Spokane’s University District.

 


Fall is a busy season for art in the Inland Northwest. This weekend, a unique arts festival will invite the public into working artists’ studios.

The Little Spokane River Valley is home to popular parks, golf courses, small farms, and suburban developments. Driving through, you might not notice the many artist studios, but this Saturday, September 28, five studios in this neighborhood will open their doors to the public, showcasing forty artists from around the Northwest.

Jeff Alessandrelli and Hajara Quinn are two Portland-based poets who came through Spokane on their way to the Montana Book Festival earlier this month. They stopped in to the SPR studio to talk with Chris Maccini about their new books and their Montana Book Festival panel titled "Is This Surreal or For Real?"

Harper Quinn is the author of Coolth (Big Lucks Books, 2018). She received her MFA from Cornell University in 2014, and her work has been supported by Literary Arts and the Regional Arts & Culture Council. Poems can be found in Gramma Daily, Gulf Coast, The Volta and Sixth Finch. She lives in Portland, OR where she works as the Program Director at the Independent Publishing Resource Center.

Now in it's sixth year, Porchfest West Central is a free local music festival and community event in the West Central Neighborhood of Spokane. Homeowners will host local musicians and performers on their porches from 3 - 7 p.m. on Saturday, September, 21st. Details and more information are at porchfestwestcentral.com.

Marshall Peterson is a Spokane-based photographer and owner of the Marmot Art Space gallery in Kendall Yards. He started Porchfest in 2014, based on the original Porchfest event in Ithaca, NY. More information about Marshall is at marshallinspokane.com.

Charlie Pepiton is the Producing Artistic Director of Square Top Theatre and Assistant Professor of Theatre and Dance at Gonzaga University. Square Top Theatre is the recipient of a Spokane Arts Grant Award (SAGA) for their upcoming production, Scent of a Thousand Rains. 

Shann Ray is a poet, short story writer, and novelist who grew up in Montana and Alaska and spent part of his childhood on the Northern Cheyenne reservation. He is the author of seven books including most recently a short story collection, Blood Fire Vapor Smoke and a poetry collection, Sweetclover, both of which were published this year.

Steve Almond is the author of ten books of fiction and non-fiction including the New York Times best-sellers, Candyfreak and Against Football. He was also the host of the popular podcast Dear Sugars with fellow author Cheryl Strayed.

Almond's latest book, William Stoner and the Battle for the Inner Life is part of the "Bookmarked" series from Ig Publishers, in which authors talk about their favorite novels and how they've impacted their life and work. The subject of Almond's book is the 1965 novel Stoner by John Williams. 

Spokane Public Radio

McCarrthy moved to idaho in 1977 to work trail crew in the Selway-Bitteroot Wilderness for the U.S. Forest Service. He later ran a range crew and worked on ranches in Hells Canyon and the Salmon River country. He started writing about winderness as a reporter for he Lewiston Morning Tribune, where he also covered cops, courts, arts, and agriculture for 10 years. He swited to environmental organizing and advocacy for two decades, as the conservation director for the Idaho Conservation league and Idaho Forest campaign durector for the Wilderness Society.

John Keeble is the author of eight books, including the new novel The Appointment: The Tale of Adaline Carson, a fictionalized account of the daughter of the famous frontiersman Kit Carson. His previous novels include Yellowfish, Broken Ground and The Shadows of Owls. His short fiction collection, Nocturnal America, won the Prairie Schooner Prize for short fiction and was published by the University of Nebraska press. He is also the author of Out of the Channel, the definitive study of the Exxon Valdez disaster.

Gregory Spatz is the author of a new collection of "bookmatched" stories and novellas, What Could Be Saved, and of the novels Inukshuk, Fiddler's Dream and No One But Us, and the short story collections Half As Happy and Wonderful Tricks. His stories have appeared in many publications, including The New Yorker, Glimmer Train Stories, Shenandoah, Epoch, Kenyon Review and New England Review.

The Spokane Print and Publishing Center is a new organization located in the West Central neighborhood of Spokane. According to their Facebook page, "The main function of the SPPC is to teach you how to do all the printing and publishing things, but that’s not all! Writing, bookbinding, screenprinting, writing, editing, design, RPG and table-top game design, zines, letterpress, printmaking..."

Simeon Mills is a writer, cartoonist, and teacher. His novel The Obsoletes is just out from Skybound Books.

Washington Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna has launched an interactive map which highlights poems about places in the state, connected by a network of highways. You can see the map, and submit your own poem at WashingtonPoeticRoutes.com.

Elena Seibert

Tommy Orange is the author of the New York Times best-selling novel, There There, and one of the headlining authors the 2019 Get Lit! Festival. There There has won numerous awards including the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award's John Leonard Prize for first book by a new voice, and the 2019 Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award for debut novel.

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