Poetry Moment

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Jonathan Johnson’s poems have been anthologized in Best American Poetry, published in recent issues of Ploughshares, Southern Review, Witness, Epoch, Prairie Schooner, Sewanee Review, Poetry Northwest, Rattle, New Ohio Review, Missouri Review and Gettysburg Review, and read on NPR. His books include the poetry collections  (Carnegie Mellon, 2018), In the Land We Imagined Ourselves (Carnegie Mellon, 2010), and Mastodon, 80% Complete (Carnegie Mellon, 2001), and the memoirs, The Desk on the Sea (Wayne State, 2019), and Hannah and the Mountain (Nebraska, 2005). Ode, his play about John Keats and Fanny Brawne, premiered in 2013 as part of the GetLit! Literary Festival. He teaches in the MFA program at Eastern Washington University and migrates between Washington, the Lake Superior Coastal town of Marquette, Michigan, and his ancestral village of Glenelg in the Scottish Highland where his cousins are still crofters.

Jonathan Johnson’s poems have been anthologized in Best American Poetry, published in recent issues of Ploughshares, Southern Review, Witness, Epoch, Prairie Schooner, Sewanee Review, Poetry Northwest, Rattle, New Ohio Review, Missouri Review and Gettysburg Review, and read on NPR. His books include the poetry collections  (Carnegie Mellon, 2018), In the Land We Imagined Ourselves (Carnegie Mellon, 2010), and Mastodon, 80% Complete (Carnegie Mellon, 2001), and the memoirs, The Desk on the Sea (Wayne State, 2019), and Hannah and the Mountain (Nebraska, 2005). Ode, his play about John Keats and Fanny Brawne, premiered in 2013 as part of the GetLit! Literary Festival. He teaches in the MFA program at Eastern Washington University and migrates between Washington, the Lake Superior Coastal town of Marquette, Michigan, and his ancestral village of Glenelg in the Scottish Highland where his cousins are still crofters.

Jonathan Johnson’s poems have been anthologized in Best American Poetry, published in recent issues of Ploughshares, Southern Review, Witness, Epoch, Prairie Schooner, Sewanee Review, Poetry Northwest, Rattle, New Ohio Review, Missouri Review and Gettysburg Review, and read on NPR. His books include the poetry collections  (Carnegie Mellon, 2018), In the Land We Imagined Ourselves (Carnegie Mellon, 2010), and Mastodon, 80% Complete (Carnegie Mellon, 2001), and the memoirs, The Desk on the Sea (Wayne State, 2019), and Hannah and the Mountain (Nebraska, 2005). Ode, his play about John Keats and Fanny Brawne, premiered in 2013 as part of the GetLit! Literary Festival. He teaches in the MFA program at Eastern Washington University and migrates between Washington, the Lake Superior Coastal town of Marquette, Michigan, and his ancestral village of Glenelg in the Scottish Highland where his cousins are still crofters.

Jonathan Johnson’s poems have been anthologized in Best American Poetry, published in recent issues of Ploughshares, Southern Review, Witness, Epoch, Prairie Schooner, Sewanee Review, Poetry Northwest, Rattle, New Ohio Review, Missouri Review and Gettysburg Review, and read on NPR. His books include the poetry collections  (Carnegie Mellon, 2018), In the Land We Imagined Ourselves (Carnegie Mellon, 2010), and Mastodon, 80% Complete (Carnegie Mellon, 2001), and the memoirs, The Desk on the Sea (Wayne State, 2019), and Hannah and the Mountain (Nebraska, 2005). Ode, his play about John Keats and Fanny Brawne, premiered in 2013 as part of the GetLit! Literary Festival. He teaches in the MFA program at Eastern Washington University and migrates between Washington, the Lake Superior Coastal town of Marquette, Michigan, and his ancestral village of Glenelg in the Scottish Highland where his cousins are still crofters.

Jonathan Johnson’s poems have been anthologized in Best American Poetry, published in recent issues of Ploughshares, Southern Review, Witness, Epoch, Prairie Schooner, Sewanee Review, Poetry Northwest, Rattle, New Ohio Review, Missouri Review and Gettysburg Review, and read on NPR. His books include the poetry collections  (Carnegie Mellon, 2018), In the Land We Imagined Ourselves (Carnegie Mellon, 2010), and Mastodon, 80% Complete (Carnegie Mellon, 2001), and the memoirs, The Desk on the Sea (Wayne State, 2019), and Hannah and the Mountain (Nebraska, 2005). Ode, his play about John Keats and Fanny Brawne, premiered in 2013 as part of the GetLit! Literary Festival. He teaches in the MFA program at Eastern Washington University and migrates between Washington, the Lake Superior Coastal town of Marquette, Michigan, and his ancestral village of Glenelg in the Scottish Highland where his cousins are still crofters.

Dean Davis

  

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others.

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