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Spokane Tribe Goes Solar

May 17, 2019
Doug Nadvornick/SPR

The Spokane Tribe is joining the green energy revolution. On Thursday, tribal officials held a ceremony to celebrate the installation of solar panels on more than two dozen tribal buildings and homes.

Washington is getting its first new full-service state park in many years. The planned park build-out is on land the state owns along the Nisqually River near Eatonville, Washington.

Millions of Americans who buy individual health insurance, and don't qualify for a federal subsidy, have been hit with sticker shock in recent years. Instability and uncertainty in the individual market — driven in part by changes Congress and the Trump administration made to the Affordable Care Act — have resulted in double-digit premium increases.

Millions of Americans who buy individual health insurance, and don't qualify for a federal subsidy, have been hit with sticker shock in recent years. Instability and uncertainty in the individual market — driven in part by changes Congress and the Trump administration made to the Affordable Care Act — have resulted in double-digit premium increases.

Now Washington state has passed a law designed to give consumers another choice: a new, "public option" health insurance plan that, in theory, will be cheaper.

Avista

Today on the Inland Journal podcast, we talk with retiring Avista CEO Scott Morris. In October, Morris will hand over the top job in the company to Avista President Dennis Vermillion and become the non-executive chairman of Avista’s board until next March. Then he’ll leave the company.

Doug Nadvornick/SPR

A Spokane software developer has unveiled an app aimed at transgendered people who are in the process of changing their genders. Robbi Katherine Anthony and her colleagues in the U.S. and Mexico have begun to raise money to bring it to market.

Joe Bruce photo

Residents of the rural Glenrose neighborhood, south of Spokane, are concerned about plans to build a sports complex there.

The Spokane Youth Sports Association has plans to construct a 20-acre sports complex in the neighborhood, but the neighbors fear it will bring complications to the area.

Sooner or later the offshore Cascadia fault zone is going to unleash a monster earthquake and tsunami. When that day comes, you hope that coastal schools, fire stations and hospitals are located high enough so that they don't get washed away just when you really need them.

In Oregon, it's state law that new schools and public safety buildings be built outside the tsunami zone. But that rule has a bullseye on it.

Doug Nadvornick/SPR

This week, the Spokane School District is hosting three open houses to explain the district’s financial situation to parents and teachers. The next one is tonight [Wednesday] from 5 to 7 pm at Rogers High School.

Administrators are talking about why the district faces a more than $20 million budget deficit and the steps they’re taking to eliminate it.

Like the crumbling gasket in your kitchen faucet, sometimes even small parts can mean a lot. Now, federal watchdogs are looking into all types of parts at a $17 billion construction project at the Hanford Nuclear Site.

The Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Energy has found a sample of parts going into a large waste treatment plant at Hanford had problems.

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