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Job Growth Stalls In Washington And Oregon During September

The unemployment rate in Washington rose one-tenth of a point to 5.7 percent in September.
Washington Employment Security Department
The unemployment rate in Washington rose one-tenth of a point to 5.7 percent in September.

Job growth stalled during September in Oregon and Washington according to new numbers from the respective state employment departments.

The unemployment rate in Washington rose one-tenth of a point to 5.7 percent in September.
Credit Washington Employment Security Department
/
Washington Employment Security Department
The unemployment rate in Washington rose one-tenth of a point to 5.7 percent in September.

In Washington's case, state labor economist Paul Turek announced Washington's unemployment rate ticked up one-tenth of a point to 5.7 percent in September. But he said is not too concerned by one month of flat hiring.

"Put it in context of what has been happening in the labor market,” Turek said. “We seem to be sustaining momentum. Every now and then we have a little blip.”

The employment departments in both Oregon and Washington noted that the pace of job gains has slowed since the beginning of summer. However, Turek sees encouraging signs of an upswing in construction and from retailers anticipating good holiday sales.

The Oregon Employment Department Tuesday that its statewide unemployment rate is holding steady at 7.1 percent.

Copyright 2014 Northwest News Network

Tom Banse covers national news, business, science, public policy, Olympic sports and human interest stories from across the Northwest. He reports from well known and out–of–the–way places in the region where important, amusing, touching, or outrageous events are unfolding. Tom's stories can be found online and heard on-air during "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered" on NPR stations in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.