Sunday Puzzle: What's The Show?

Apr 11, 2021

On-air Challenge: A hardish one today. Every answer is the name of a classic TV game show, past or present. Identify the shows from their anagrams.

Ex. WHOLE FREE FUTON (5,2,7) --> WHEEL OF FORTUNE
1. DOPER JAY (8)
2. DROP SAWS (8)
3. OFF A CRATER (4,6)
4. INNOCENT ACTOR (13)
5. MANY WHISTLE (5,2,4)
6. SHOW ODORS EQUALLY (9,7)

Last week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Steve Engler, of Wayland, Mass. Write in capital letters the name of a popular vehicle brand. Move two vertical lines closer together. Add a horizontal line. The result will be another popular vehicle brand. What names are these?

Challenge answer: CIVIC --> GMC

Winner: Laurie Boeder of Washington, D.C.

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Steve Baggish, of Arlington, Mass. Think of part of the body in seven letters. Add an "N" and rearrange all the letters to name two more parts of the body (none related to the original word). What body parts are these?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here by Thursday, April 15, at 3 p.m. ET. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzlemaster. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And I understand, as of this past week, you have edited 10,000 puzzles since joining The New York Times as their crossword editor in 1993. What a milestone.

SHORTZ: Thank you. Thank you. That was last Wednesday, and there was a nice interview with me.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How many puzzles do you think you've done on WEEKEND EDITION?

SHORTZ: Oh, man. The first year or two, you know, it was not every week, and then it was every week, and it's been a little over 34 years. That's a lot.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's a lot indeed (laughter). All right. Remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Steve Engler of Wayland, Mass. I said, write in capital letters the name of a popular vehicle brand. Move two vertical lines closer together. Add a horizontal line, and the result will be another popular vehicle brand. What names are these? And the answer is Civic. If you take the two I's of Civic and move them closer together to the V, you get an M, and add a horizontal line to the C, you get a G, and the result is GMC.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received 200 correct responses, and the winner is Laurie Boeder of Washington, D.C. Congratulations.

LAURIE BOEDER: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How'd you figure it out?

BOEDER: Actually, I already knew the answer to this one. A friend of mine came up with the exact same puzzle not long ago.

SHORTZ: Wow.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) And what was it like when you got the call?

BOEDER: I didn't believe it. I said, you're kidding. And like so many people, I almost didn't answer my phone.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's why I always ask this question. All right. Are you ready to play The Puzzle?

BOEDER: I guess so.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It'll be good. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right, Laurie. It's a hard-ish one today. Every answer is the name of a classic TV game show, past or present. Identify the shows from their anagrams. For example, if I said whole free futon, five-two-seven, you would say "Wheel Of Fortune" because you can rearrange the letters of whole free futon to make "Wheel Of Fortune."

BOEDER: OK.

SHORTZ: Here is number one - doper jay. That's D-O-P-E-R J-A-Y, and it's a solid word, eight letters.

BOEDER: "Jeopardy!"

SHORTZ: "Jeopardy!" is it. Number two is drop saws - D-R-O-P S-A-W-S. It's a solid, eight-letter word.

BOEDER: You got a hint?

SHORTZ: And here's your hint. It starts with a P. It was a word game.

BOEDER: "Password." I love that game.

SHORTZ: "Password." Off a crater - O-F-F A C-R-A-T-E-R - off a crater, four-six.

BOEDER: Four-six, off a crater.

SHORTZ: This is a 21st century game show.

BOEDER: Oh, I'm in trouble on this one - off a crater, 21st century game show.

SHORTZ: I'll tell you the first letter is F.

BOEDER: F.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: In fact, it's a double F.

SHORTZ: Both F's.

BOEDER: Oh, it's not "Family Feud." Oh, guys, I'm losing it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Synonym for scared.

BOEDER: Oh, "Fear Factor."

SHORTZ: "Fear Factor" is it. Good job.

BOEDER: Thanks, guys. I needed those hints.

SHORTZ: Try this one - innocent actor - I-N-N-O-C-E-N-T A-C-T-O-R.

BOEDER: Innocent actor.

SHORTZ: And it's a solid, 13-letter word.

BOEDER: Wow. "Concentration."

SHORTZ: Oh, man. Bravo.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job.

SHORTZ: All right, try this - many whistle - M-A-N-Y W-H-I-S-T-L-E, five-two-four.

BOEDER: Five-two-four.

SHORTZ: And the five-letter word starts with W.

BOEDER: "What's My Line?"

SHORTZ: Yeah, you got it. All right, here's your last one - show odors equally. That's S-H-O-W O-D-O-R-S E-Q-U-A-L-L-Y, nine-seven.

BOEDER: Nine - and you may as well just give me the hint right off the bat.

SHORTZ: The initials are HS.

BOEDER: HS.

SHORTZ: It's a classic show, and there were nine celebrities.

BOEDER: Oh, "Hollywood Squares."

SHORTZ: "Hollywood Squares."

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Great job. How do you feel?

BOEDER: Well, I feel like I should have done a better job, but I also - it's a great pleasure to be on this show. Thank you guys so much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: No, you did really well. You really did. This was a hard one. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Laurie, which member station do you listen to?

BOEDER: We are sustaining members of WAMU in Washington. And I need to give a shout out to Prairie Public Radio in Bismarck, N.D., my first NPR station.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Indeed. Laurie Boeder of Washington, D.C., thank you so much for playing The Puzzle.

BOEDER: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Will, what is next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it comes from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. Think of a part of the body in seven letters. Add an N and rearrange all the letters to name two more parts of the body, none related to the original word. What body parts are these? So again, part of the body, seven letters. Add an N. Rearrange all the letters to name two more parts of the body - what body parts are these?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, April 15 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we could reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And if you pick up the phone, you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.