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Gay Marriage In Idaho Cleared To Start Wednesday Morning

Tabitha Simmons (left) and Katherine Sprague received a marriage license in Latah County, Idaho, on Friday.
Laura Flowers
/
Tabitha Simmons (left) and Katherine Sprague received a marriage license in Latah County, Idaho, on Friday.

Same-sex couples in Idaho can start getting married and have those marriages legally recognized by the state starting Wednesday morning.

Tabitha Simmons (left) and Katherine Sprague received a marriage license in Latah County, Idaho, on Friday.
Credit Laura Flowers
/
Tabitha Simmons (left) and Katherine Sprague received a marriage license in Latah County, Idaho, on Friday.

Judges from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said their ruling in favor of gay marriage takes effect at 9 a.m. Pacific or 10 Mountain time this Wednesday.

In court briefs, Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden concluded further attempts keep gay marriage on hold would likely be unsuccessful in light of the Supreme Court’s recent decision not to consider cases involving bans in other states.

This latest round in court follows a week of legal back-and-forth during which at least seven couples in Moscow, Idaho and one couple in Twin Falls received marriage licenses amid the confusion.

Idaho Governor Butch Otter sought Supreme Court intervention last week after the 9th Circuit ruled Idaho’s voter-passed gay marriage ban is unconstitutional. However, Idaho’s attorney general leaves the door open to future appeals. He said the state still holds its position that Idaho’s law is valid.

In a separate letter, Governor Butch Otter argued the court should keep gay marriage on hold while he asks a larger panel of judges to reconsider the case.

Copyright 2014 Northwest News Network

Jessica Robinson
Jessica Robinson reported for four years from the Northwest News Network's bureau in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho as the network's Inland Northwest Correspondent. From the politics of wolves to mining regulation to small town gay rights movements, Jessica covered the economic, demographic and environmental trends that have shaped places east of the Cascades. Jessica left the Northwest News Network in 2015 for a move to Norway.