Chris Maccini

Program Production Director

Chris grew up in Spokane and has many fond childhood memories of being subjected to the voices of SPR while in the backseat of his parents' car.  After moving to Upstate New York and graduating from Colgate University with a degree in Economics, he spent six years living in Seattle working for non-profit organizations and sailing around the Puget Sound with his wife, Tracie, and their boat-dog, Mollusk. He returned to Spokane to attend graduate school at Eastern Washington University and graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing. 

With Spokane Public Radio as an intern since May 2017 and as an employee since June 2018, helps produce arts and special programming such as "The Bookshelf," "Poetry Moment," "Northwest Arts Review," special features and more. 

Ways to Connect

How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism is read for The Bookshelf by the author, Eileen Garvin. It was first broadcast in 2011. Garvin's debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton in 2021.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters. More information at www.eileengarvin.com

Eileen Garvin is the author of How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism.

Her debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters.

David Axelrod’s second collection of nonfiction, The Eclipse I Call Father: Essays on Absence was published by Oregon State University Press in the spring of 2019. Axelrod wrote the introduction, “My Interests Are People,” for About People: Photographs by Gert Berliner, which appeared in the summer of 2018 from Arts End Books. His eighth collection of poems, The Open Hand, appeared in 2017 from Lost Horse Press. Axelrod directs the low residency MFA and Wilderness, Ecology, and Community program at Eastern Oregon University.

Emily Walter writes, teaches and cooks in Missoula, Montana. Originally, from and educated in Michigan, she now calls Montana home with her husband and daughter. Her poetry and nonfiction can be found in 32 Poems, High Country News, Narrative Magazine and others. 

How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism is read for The Bookshelf by the author, Eileen Garvin. It was first broadcast in 2011. Garvin's debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton in 2021.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters. More information at www.eileengarvin.com

Eileen Garvin is the author of How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism.

Her debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters.

Emily Walter writes, teaches and cooks in Missoula, Montana. Originally, from and educated in Michigan, she now calls Montana home with her husband and daughter. Her poetry and nonfiction can be found in 32 Poems, High Country News, Narrative Magazine and others. 

How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism is read for The Bookshelf by the author, Eileen Garvin. It was first broadcast in 2011. Garvin's debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton in 2021.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters. More information at www.eileengarvin.com

Eileen Garvin is the author of How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism.

Her debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters.

Emily Walter writes, teaches and cooks in Missoula, Montana. Originally, from and educated in Michigan, she now calls Montana home with her husband and daughter. Her poetry and nonfiction can be found in 32 Poems, High Country News, Narrative Magazine and others. 

Emily Walter writes, teaches and cooks in Missoula, Montana. Originally, from and educated in Michigan, she now calls Montana home with her husband and daughter. Her poetry and nonfiction can be found in 32 Poems, High Country News, Narrative Magazine and others. 

How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism is read for The Bookshelf by the author, Eileen Garvin. It was first broadcast in 2011. Garvin's debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton in 2021.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters. More information at www.eileengarvin.com

Eileen Garvin is the author of How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism.

Her debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters.

Emily Walter writes, teaches and cooks in Missoula, Montana. Originally, from and educated in Michigan, she now calls Montana home with her husband and daughter. Her poetry and nonfiction can be found in 32 Poems, High Country News, Narrative Magazine and others. 

How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism is read for The Bookshelf by the author, Eileen Garvin. It was first broadcast in 2011. Garvin's debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton in 2021.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters. More information at www.eileengarvin.com

Eileen Garvin is the author of How to Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism.

Her debut novel, The Music of Bees, is forthcoming from Dutton.

She lives in Oregon with her husband and their critters.

Emily Walter writes, teaches and cooks in Missoula, Montana. Originally, from and educated in Michigan, she now calls Montana home with her husband and daughter. Her poetry and nonfiction can be found in 32 Poems, High Country News, Narrative Magazine and others. 

Chris La Tray is a Métis writer and storyteller. His first book, One-Sentence Journal: Short Poems and Essays from the World at Large (2018, Riverfeet Press) won the 2018 Montana Book Award and a 2019 High Plains Book Award. His next book, Becoming Little Shell, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2021. Chris is an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians and lives near Missoula, Montana.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "Hope" by Dan Gemeinhart and "What Rises Beneath" by Jess Walter

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

Chris La Tray is a Métis writer and storyteller. His first book, One-Sentence Journal: Short Poems and Essays from the World at Large (2018, Riverfeet Press) won the 2018 Montana Book Award and a 2019 High Plains Book Award. His next book, Becoming Little Shell, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2021. Chris is an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians and lives near Missoula, Montana.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "Bandits" by Sharma Shields and "St. Helen and the Spokanites" by Samuel Ligon.

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

Chris La Tray is a Métis writer and storyteller. His first book, One-Sentence Journal: Short Poems and Essays from the World at Large (2018, Riverfeet Press) won the 2018 Montana Book Award and a 2019 High Plains Book Award. His next book, Becoming Little Shell, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2021. Chris is an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians and lives near Missoula, Montana.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "Feast, Smudge, Snag" by Tiffany Midge and "Waffle Hut" by Neal Thompson.

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

Chris La Tray is a Métis writer and storyteller. His first book, One-Sentence Journal: Short Poems and Essays from the World at Large (2018, Riverfeet Press) won the 2018 Montana Book Award and a 2019 High Plains Book Award. His next book, Becoming Little Shell, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2021. Chris is an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians and lives near Missoula, Montana.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "Volcanic" by Deb Caletti and "The Department of Long-Term Catastrophes" by Eli Francovich

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

Chris La Tray is a Métis writer and storyteller. His first book, One-Sentence Journal: Short Poems and Essays from the World at Large (2018, Riverfeet Press) won the 2018 Montana Book Award and a 2019 High Plains Book Award. His next book, Becoming Little Shell, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2021. Chris is an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians and lives near Missoula, Montana.

Dean Davis | Pictures of Poets

Chris Cook is Spokane’s current Poet Laureate. His first collection of poetry, The View from the Broken Mic, was published in 2012 (Gray Dog Press). Additional work has been published by Sage Hill Press, Scablands Books, and The Spokesman-Review. His children’s poetry has been published by Little, Brown Books, Meadowbrook Press, and Scholastic Press. His latest collection, Damn Good Cookie, was released in 2016 by Korrektiv Press.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "Peebags for Manboy" by Matthew Sullivan and "My Father's Ashes" by Jamie Ford.

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

Vanessa Veselka. She is the author of the novel Zazen, which won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. Her new novel is The Great Offshore Grounds, a sweeping story of a family drama tackling social status, death, love, femininity, American greed and mythology, the current state of the US healthcare system, sky-high rents, and the struggle to get by.

Dean Davis | Pictures of Poets

Chris Cook is Spokane’s current Poet Laureate. His first collection of poetry, The View from the Broken Mic, was published in 2012 (Gray Dog Press). Additional work has been published by Sage Hill Press, Scablands Books, and The Spokesman-Review. His children’s poetry has been published by Little, Brown Books, Meadowbrook Press, and Scholastic Press. His latest collection, Damn Good Cookie, was released in 2016 by Korrektiv Press.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "Redzone" by Ben Goldfarb and "Fissures" by Kris Dinnison.

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

Dean Davis | Pictures of Poets

  

Chris Cook is Spokane’s current Poet Laureate. His first collection of poetry, The View from the Broken Mic, was published in 2012 (Gray Dog Press). Additional work has been published by Sage Hill Press, Scablands Books, and The Spokesman-Review. His children’s poetry has been published by Little, Brown Books, Meadowbrook Press, and Scholastic Press. His latest collection, Damn Good Cookie, was released in 2016 by Korrektiv Press.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "Mayday" by Bruce Holbert and "Miriam and Clara, 1980" by Johanna Stoberock.

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

Dean Davis | Pictures of Poets

Chris Cook is Spokane’s current Poet Laureate. His first collection of poetry, The View from the Broken Mic, was published in 2012 (Gray Dog Press). Additional work has been published by Sage Hill Press, Scablands Books, and The Spokesman-Review. His children’s poetry has been published by Little, Brown Books, Meadowbrook Press, and Scholastic Press. His latest collection, Damn Good Cookie, was released in 2016 by Korrektiv Press.

Now in its seventh year, the Spokesman-Review Summer Stories is a special section in the Sunday Spokesman-Review newspaper featuring original short fiction by local authors on a common theme. This year’s theme is Mount Saint Helens, which erupted 40 years ago this year on May 18, 1980.

On Tonight's episode of The Bookshelf, we present two Summer Stories, "The Thick Darkness" by Shawn Vestal and "Rumblings” by Beth Piatote.

You can read the full Summer Stories series at www.spokesman.com/pages/summer-stories-2020

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