Chris Maccini

Production Director

Chris grew up in Spokane and has many fond childhood memories of being subjected to the voices of SPR while in the backseat of his parents' car.  After moving to Upstate New York and graduating from Colgate University with a degree in Economics, he spent six years living in Seattle working for non-profit organizations and sailing around the Puget Sound with his wife, Tracie, and their boat-dog, Mollusk. He returned to Spokane to attend graduate school at Eastern Washington University and graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing. 

Chris produces arts and special programming such as "The Bookshelf," "Poetry Moment," "Northwest Arts Review," special features and more. He also regularly hosts NPR's afternoon news program, All Things Considered.

Ways to Connect

Melanie Dunea

Kevin Young is the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and poetry editor of The New Yorker. From 2016-2020 he served as the director of the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. He is the author of thirteen books of poetry and prose, most recently, the poetry collection Brown and the nonfiction book Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts & Fake News. He is also the editor of the anthology African American Poetry: 250 Years of Struggle & Song.

Young was a featured in the Spokane Community College’s Hagan Center for the Humanities  "Diversity Dialogues: Conversations About Race and Equity."

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Blue Flower Arts

Claudia Rankine, a poet, essayist and professor at Yale University. Her 2014 book Citizen: An American Lyric which explores the relentless, personal effects of microaggressions and everyday racism was a finalist for the National Book Award and won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry. In her latest book, Just Us:An American Conversation, Rankine sets out to have uncomfortable conversations with white people about race and how (or whether) they perceive their own whiteness. 

 Using funds from her 2016 MacArthur Fellowship, Rankine founded the The Racial Imaginary Institute, an interdisciplinary center for writers, artists, and scholars to examine artists' whiteness and race as social constructs. She was the 20201 year’s guest for Gonzaga University’s 4th Annual Race & Racism Lecture.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

Nance Van Winckel's most recent collection of poems, which won the Pacific Coast Poetry Award, is Our Foreigner (Beyond Baroque Books, 2016). Other collections of poems include Pacific Walkers (U. of Washington Press, 2013), No Starling (U. of Washington Press, 2007), Beside Ourselves (Miami U. Press, 2000), After a Spell (Miami U. Press, 1998), The Dirt(Miami U. Press, 1994), and Bad Girl, with Hawk (U. of Illinois, 1988).

 

She is also the author of five books of fiction, most recently Ever Yrs, a novel in the form of a scrapbook (Twisted Road Publications, 2014) and Boneland: Linked Stories (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Other books of fiction include Curtain Creek Farm(Persea Books, 2000), Quake (U. of MO Press, 1997), and Limited Lifetime Warranty (U. of MO Press, 1994).

She also works with visual poetry, altered pages of old books and other visual hybrid forms. Her first collection of this work is Book of No Ledge (Pleiades Press, 2016).

Nance is a Professor Emerita at Eastern Washington U. and the recipient of two NEA fellowships, the Paterson Fiction Prize, the American Short Fiction Award, the Poetry Society of America's Gordon Barber Poetry Award, a Christopher Isherwood Fiction Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and numerous other honors.

When Gonzaga University professor Tod Marshall began helping to plan the university's 4th Annual Race and Racism Lecture, he decided to do something different. The former state poet laureate wanted to include as many people as possible after a summer of racial justice protests and a contentious election. So he reached out to local teachers to engage high school students in advance of Wednesday's lecture.

Dean Davis

  

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Dean Davis

Kate Peterson’s chapbook Grist won the Floating Bridge Prize and was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2016. Her poetry, prose, and interviews have been published in Sugar House Review, Glassworks, The Sierra Nevada Review, Rattle, Willow Springs, Hawai`i Pacific Review, and others. Kate is the director of Get Lit! Programs, home of Spokane’s annual week-long literary festival. 

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Kathryn Smith a poet and mixed media artist based in Spokane, WA. She is the author of the poetry collection Book of Exodus and the chapbook Chosen Companions of the Goblin. Her newest collection Self-Portrait with Cephalopod, won Copper Nickel’s 2019 Jake Adam York Prize, and will be released by Milkweed Editions on February 9th, 2021

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

Photo by Rajah Bose

Sharma Shields is the author of a short story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac, and The Cassandra. Sharma’s writing has appeared in Electric Lit, Slice, The New York Times, Kenyon Review, Iowa Review, Fugue, and elsewhere and has garnered such awards as the 2016 Washington State Book Award, the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Tim McGinnis Award for Humor, a Grant for Artist Projects from Artist Trust, and the A.B. Guthrie Award for Outstanding Prose. She received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Washington (2000) and her MFA from the University of Montana (2004). Sharma has worked in independent bookstores and public libraries throughout Washington State and now lives in Spokane with her husband and two young children.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

Daudi Abe is a Seattle-based professor, writer, and historian who has taught and written about culture, race, gender, education, communication, hip-hop, and sports for over 20 years. His latest book is Emerald Street: A History of Hip Hop in Seattle. Abe is one of this year’s speakers at the Hagan Center for the Humanities at Spokane Community College for their series: Diversity Dialogues: Conversations About Race and Equity.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

The author of a serial novel—Miller Cane: A True & Exact History—which appeared in fifty installments in Spokane’s weekly newspaper, The Inlander, as well as online, on Spokane Public Radio, and as a podcast. Ligon is the author of four previous books of fiction, including two novels—Among the Dead and Dreaming and Safe in Heaven Dead—and two collections of stories, Wonderland, illustrated by Stephen Knezovich, and Drift and Swerve. Ligon is co-editor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. His stories have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, New England Review, and elsewhere. His essays appear in the Inlander. He teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference.

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

Marlon James is the author of four novels including A Brief History of Seven Killings, which won the 2015 Man Booker Prize, and most recently Black Leopard, Red Wolf, which was a finalist for the 2019 National Book Award. The novel is the first in a planned epic fantasy trilogy set in an ancient, mythical Africa. A profile in the New Yorker called it a novel that “counters the dominant impression of the genre it inhabits. Instead of kings with swords and flaxen-haired princesses, the novel contains pitch-skinned witches haloed in bees, and vampires that turn your blood into blue lightning, and demons that come screeching across rooftops in the dark.”

 James is the first of this year’s Hagan Center Speakers Series presented by Community Colleges of Spokane. The topic this year is "Diversity Dialogues: Conversations About Race and Equity.” Marlon James will be hosting a live virtual event on Wednesday, January 20th at 5 p.m. Spokane Public Radio is the Speaker Series’ media partner.

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle’s Civic Poet, from 2015-2017 and is the author of the Pushcart nominated Killing Marías (Two Sylvias Press) and This City, (Floating Bridge Press) and the creator of  the acclaimed Seattle Poetic Grid. She is also a Hedgebrook and VONA alumna, a 2014 Jack Straw fellow, the recipient of a King County 4Culture grant and an individual artist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Born in El Salvador she came to the United States in 1981. She has an MA in Urban Planning, a teaching certificate and an MFA in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, La Bloga, Dialogo and Psychological Perspectives among others. 

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