Chris Maccini

Program Production Director

Chris grew up in Spokane and has many fond childhood memories of being subjected to the voices of SPR while in the backseat of his parents' car.  After moving to Upstate New York and graduating from Colgate University with a degree in Economics, he spent six years living in Seattle working for non-profit organizations and sailing around the Puget Sound with his wife, Tracie, and their boat-dog, Mollusk. He returned to Spokane to attend graduate school at Eastern Washington University and graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing. 

With Spokane Public Radio as an intern since May 2017 and as an employee since June 2018, helps produce arts and special programming such as "The Bookshelf," "Poetry Moment," "Northwest Arts Review," special features and more. 

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Misty and Hope Shipman-Ellingburg are indigenous writers and producers from Spokane. Enrolled members of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe, they began writing and producing for film in 2015. Through the last four years, they have honed their skills, co-writing and producing two short films, BLOODHOUND and PIXEL. Their SAGA award will support production of their new film, TIGER LILY IS MY LITTLE SISTER, which wants to answer the question: “What does a modern Salish story look like?” as they address themes surrounding Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women.

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

Published in 1895, “Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses was written as a satire and criticism of the writings of fellow American author, James Fenimore Cooper. The essay claims Cooper is guilty of verbose writing, poor plotting, glaring inconsistencies, overused clichés, cardboard characterizations, and a host of similar "offenses."

"How I Edited an Agricultural Paper" was originally published in Mark Twain's 1875 collection of short stories, Sketches New and Old

"Luck" was first published in 1891 in Harper's Magazine. It was subsequently reprinted in 1892 in the anthology Merry Tales.

"Something About Repentence" is taken from Letters from the Earth, which was written circa 1909 and published posthumously in 1962.

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

Published in 1880, A Tramp Abroad details a journey by Mark Twain, with his friend Harris (a character created for the book, and based on his closest friend, Joseph Twichell), through central and southern Europe.

Roughing It follows the travels of young Mark Twain through the Wild West during the years 1861–1867. It was published in 1872.

Heather Tillery lives in Spokane with her husband, three daughters, and her cat, each beloved, and all muses. She has a B.A. in Creative Writing, and is currently a MFA candidate at Eastern Washington University.  Her poetry explores the themes of motherhood, the journey towards wholeness, and navigating life in present day America. 

The Senate is holding a trial on the impeachment of President Trump, who is accused by the U.S. House of abusing his power and obstructing Congress. Each day of the trial will stream through this player as proceedings begin. At the conclusion of the trial, senators are expected to vote on whether Trump should be removed from office.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Published in 1885, “The Private History of a Campaign that Failed” is a highly fictionalized memoir of Mark Twain's two-week stint in the pro-Confederate Missouri State Guard.

Also in this episode is "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," which was Twain's first great success as a writer and brought him national attention upon its publication in 1865.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Published in 1885, “The Private History of a Campaign that Failed” is a highly fictionalized memoir of Mark Twain's two-week stint in the pro-Confederate Missouri State Guard.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Old Times on the Mississippi was originally published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875. In these stories, Twain tells of his experience working on riverboats on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi was later incorporated in to Twain's larger work, Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883.

Tom Bacon reads these classic Mark Twain tales for The Bookshelf.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Old Times on the Mississippi was originally published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875. In these stories, Twain tells of his experience working on riverboats on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi was later incorporated in to Twain's larger work, Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883.

Tom Bacon reads these classic Mark Twain tales for The Bookshelf.

Tim Hunt holds a Ph. D. in English from Northern Illinois University which he never used much since he mainly taught interdisciplinary studies, non-profit management, and communications.  He came to Idaho in 1987 to be the executive director of The Festival at Sandpoint in the Gunther Schuller years.  He returned to higher education at Lewis-Clark State College as an Associate Professor of Language, Literature and Communications and Director of the Coeur d’Alene Center.  His next job was as a field organizer for Planned Parenthood of the Inland Northwest which was then the name of the Spokane Affiliate.  He is retired and lives in Hayden with his wife Kathryn and their two cats.

Old Times on the Mississippi was originally published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875. In these stories, Twain tells of his experience working on riverboats on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi was later incorporated in to Twain's larger work, Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883.

Tom Bacon reads these classic Mark Twain tales for The Bookshelf.


Brian Deemy from Spokane Tintype Studio has recieved a Spokane Arts Grant Award, which will allow him to offer classes here in spokane where students and subjects will be able to step through a time capsule, sit in front of a 115 year old camera, and see their image reflected in a process dating back to the Civil War.

Old Times on the Mississippi was originally published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875. In these stories, Twain tells of his experience working on riverboats on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi was later incorporated in to Twain's larger work, Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883.

Tom Bacon reads these classic Mark Twain tales for The Bookshelf.

Old Times on the Mississippi was originally published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875. In these stories, Twain tells of his experience working on riverboats on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi was later incorporated in to Twain's larger work, Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883.

Tom Bacon reads these classic Mark Twain tales for The Bookshelf.

Old Times on the Mississippi was originally published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875. In these stories, Twain tells of his experience working on riverboats on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi was later incorporated in to Twain's larger work, Life on the Mississippi, published in 1883.

Tom Bacon reads these classic Mark Twain tales for The Bookshelf.

Verne Windham offers this tribute to Randel Wagner, who served as Director of Vocal Studies and Choirs at Eastern Washington University for nearly 20 years. Wagner passed away December 22, 2019 at the age of 67.

Derek Sheffield’s collection of poetry, Through the Second Skin (Orchises, 2013), was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His poems have also appeared in The Southern Review, Poetry, The Gettysburg Review, AGNI, and The Georgia Review, and were given special mention in the Puschart Prize Anthology.

Chris Maccini

For nearly ten years, Spokane Youth Ballet (SYB) has provided performance opportunities to dance students in the Spokane area by producing professional-level ballets starring local dancers. With SAGA support, SYB will be expanding its mission of promoting the art of dance by taking ballet into local schools.

Derek Sheffield’s collection of poetry, Through the Second Skin (Orchises, 2013), was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His poems have also appeared in The Southern Review, Poetry, The Gettysburg Review, AGNI, and The Georgia Review, and were given special mention in the Puschart Prize Anthology.

Chris Maccini

 


Last month, Spokane Arts announced the most recent winners of the Spokane Arts Grant Award. SAGA Awards, as they’re called, give individuals or organizations up to $10,000 to fund a project or cover operations costs. One of this round’s recipients is the Spokane Youth Ballet, led by artistic director Naomi Hanvey.

Derek Sheffield’s collection of poetry, Through the Second Skin (Orchises, 2013), was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His poems have also appeared in The Southern Review, Poetry, The Gettysburg Review, AGNI, and The Georgia Review, and were given special mention in the Puschart Prize Anthology.

Derek Sheffield’s collection of poetry, Through the Second Skin (Orchises, 2013), was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His poems have also appeared in The Southern Review, Poetry, The Gettysburg Review, AGNI, and The Georgia Review, and were given special mention in the Puschart Prize Anthology.

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