Mia Venkat

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Some people wear their hearts on their sleeves, as the saying goes. And our next guest, well, she wears hers on her ears.

CRYSTAL WAHPEPAH: So these are choke cherry earrings. And I love choke cherries. I love berries.

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"Could be a hit," country artist George Birge says with a shrug and a smile at the end of a TikTok video from last year.

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The first time sociologist Mary de Young heard about QAnon, she thought: "Here we go again."

De Young spent her career studying moral panics — specifically, what became known as the "Satanic Panic" of the 1980s, when false accusations of the abuse of children in satanic rituals spread across the United States.