Nathan Weinbender

Movies 101 Co-Host

Nathan is an entertainment writer and film reviewer. He also produces stories and reviews for Spokane7.

"Antebellum" is a new "Get Out"-style social issues thriller that wants to be a thoughtful and provocative allegory about the mistreatment of Black people in America. But Nathan Weinbender says it's so structurally confused and lacking in humanity that it just ends up being tasteless.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public 
Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

"The Burnt Orange Heresy," a new art-world thriller available to rent on demand, is -- according to Nathan Weinbender -- just like an intriguing painting on a wall: Depending on how you squint at it, it's either an intriguing allegory about the value of art, or it's merely a silly potboiler. Here's his review.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

New on Netflix is the latest cinematic headtrip from writer-director Charlie Kaufman, a dark comedy/existential nightmare titled "I'm Thinking of Ending Things." It's not going to be everyone's cup of tea, Nathan Weinbender says, but fans of the cerebral and strange shouldn't miss it.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

Although Nikola Tesla is now a household name, he was nearly relegated to the margins of scientific history. The new biopic "Tesla," starring Ethan Hawke, looks to right those wrongs, and Nathan Weinbender says the film takes a strange and unconventional approach to a story you might already know.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

"Project Power," now streaming on Netflix, imagines a world where a street drug gives temporary superpowers to anyone who takes it. Nathan Weinbender takes a look at the new big-budget thriller, which bogs down a terrific premise with mostly predictable action.  

Seth Rogen has made a career out of basically playing himself, but in the fish-out-of-water comedy "An American Pickle," streaming on HBO Max, he takes on a more complicated dual role. It's a new twist in a long career, Nathan Weinbender says, and in a film that's often funny but tonally uneven.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

As the pandemic ratchets up again, the idea of escaping to an isolated AirBnb sounds more tempting than ever. But the new horror film "The Rental," about a staycation that turns deadly, milks that premise for all its worth, and Nathan Weinbender says it's a surprisingly effective thriller on a dime.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX. 

Director Kelly Reichardt is known for her deliberately paced, deeply humane dramas set in the Pacific Northwest, and her latest is called "First Cow," the story of desperation and theft in 1820s Oregon. Following a brief theatrical run before lockdowns, the movie is now available to rent on iTunes and Amazon, and Nathan Weinbender says it's a beautiful fable about American history and the majesty of nature. 

When you're watching a documentary, do you ever wonder where the unvarnished truth ends and filmmaking techniques begin? A new film called "Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets," now available to rent through Altavod.com, captures life inside a Vegas bar through unusual circumstances, which Nathan Weinbender says is bound to inspire interesting conversation, possibly over drinks. 

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

It's becoming less and less likely that we're going to have a standard summer movie season, but that doesn't mean new movies aren't finding their ways to audiences. Two recent releases, the sci-fi mystery "The Vast of Night" and the experimental literary biopic "Shirley," are both worth streaming in your own home theater. Nathan Weinbender says they'll give you a lot to think about.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

Since leaving "The Daily Show" in 2015, Jon Stewart has become a political activist and occasional TV presence, but now he's back in the director's chair for his second feature film, Irresistible, a political satire about a small-town election starring Steve Carell. Nathan Weinbender takes a look at the new comedy, now available to rent on iTunes and Amazon, which he says is just a little too anemic and a little too dated to match the current climate. 

There's only so much you can do with a familiar premise. Take, for instance, "The Invisible Man," which has been reworked dozens of times over in the last century. But Nathan Weinbender says this newest version, starring Elisabeth Moss, is a surprisingly fresh take on a plot you thought you knew.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

Released earlier this month, "Birds of Prey," the first solo outing of Margot Robbie's antihero Harley Quinn, has been underperforming at the box office. It's still playing in most mainstream theaters, but Nathan Weinbender says it's worth checking out, especially in the doldrums of February.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

The allegations surrounding Harvey Weinstein are being deliberated in the court of law right now, so the new drama "The Assistant" is of particular interest. It's one of the first movies to deal explicitly with issues of Hollywood harassment in light of the Me Too movement, and Nathan Weinbender says it's a drama that finds power in its silence.

From Madonna's "Truth or Dare" to the recent spate of 3D concert films, pop stars have often used non-fiction films as a way to show their supposed true selves. Taylor Swift is the latest, and her new Netflix documentary "Miss Americana" is, according to Nathan Weinbender, part PR strategy, part cultural critique.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

Told through technical wizardry and harrowing cinematography, Sam Mendes' "1917" is designed to place you right into the confusion and violence of World War I, right alongside its characters. Nathan Weinbender takes a look at 2020's first real blockbuster, which is also a frontrunner for best picture and best director at the Oscars.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

"Cats," the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical inspired by T.S. Eliot's poetry, was a Broadway smash. "Cats," the new movie adaptation from Tom Hooper, is a box office bomb. Nathan Weinbender takes a look at what might be the strangest film of 2019, one that almost needs to be seen to be believed.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

It's one thing to reflect on your own troubled childhood, and it's another to make a major motion picture out of it. That's what Shia LaBeouf has done, casting himself as his own father in the new film "Honey Boy," about a troubled actor looking back on his life. Nathan Weinbender says it's a tricky, messy film, but that's part of its impact.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

Everyone loves Mister Rogers. Everyone also loves Tom Hanks. And so it seems safe to assume that Tom Hanks playing Mister Rogers is a can't-miss combination. "A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood" is a look at the TV personality's unusual manner of being, and Nathan Weinbender says it's a pleasant movie that also takes some big risks.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

How does one go about describing the South Korean thriller "Parasite" without giving away its biggest secrets and explaining its unusual tone? It's a difficult film to review, but Nathan Weinbender did it anyway, and it turns out to be one of the wildest and most entertaining films of 2019.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

For those of you who like your movies weird, make sure to put Robert Eggers' black-and-white psychological freakout "The Lighthouse" at the top of your to-see list. Either you'll hate it, or you'll think it's one of the best movies of the year; either way, Nathan Weinbender says it's a singular and powerful vision from the director of "The Witch."

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

In Hollywood, the franchise is king, and new properties exist to spin off more material. But did we really need another "Zombieland" movie? Nathan Weinbender takes a look at the long-awaited sequel, subtitled 
"Double Tap," which might not be very funny but at least isn't all that difficult to sit through.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

It's already one of the year's most controversial, divisive and financially successful movies -- "Joker," the origin story of the DC supervillain, has obviously ruffled some feathers. Nathan Weinbender says that, even though it's not as deep as it thinks it is, the movie has a vision and a lead performance that's impossible to write off.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

It seems that the only movie anybody's talking about right now is the gritty "Joker," but that's a review for another time. Instead, Nathan Weinbender is catching up on movies from earlier in the year that would make for ideal Halloween viewing -- "Annabelle Comes Home" and "Crawl," both stylish genre films that are a whole lot better than they have any business being.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

The summer movie season is starting to wane, but leave it up to the "Fast & Furious" franchise to pass the finish line right before the deadline. This ninth film, a spin-off called "Hobbs & Shaw," is hardly a memorable action spectacular, though Nathan Weinbender says the series' fans should find plenty to enjoy.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

It's a tantalizing what-if: Everyone forgot who the Beatles were, but somehow you remember all the songs. That's the set-up for "Yesterday," in which everyone hears the Fab Four's genius for the first time. Nathan Weinbender takes a look at the new romantic fastasy, which takes a good idea and turns it predictable.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

In between his great narrative films, Martin Scorsese has produced some of the most interesting music documentaries of recent years. His latest, "Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story," mixes fact and fiction in its exploration of one of the singer-songwriter's most famous tours. Nathan Weinbender says the film, now streaming on Netflix, is a must for Dylan fans.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

"Amazing Grace," a concert film that depicts the recording of a 1972 Aretha Franklin album of the same name, has long been high on lists of movies that were never finished. After a long and troubled post-production period, "Amazing Grace" is -- somewhat miraculously -- in theaters, and Nathan Weinbender says it's a powerful testament to perhaps the greatest vocalist of a generation.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and one of the film critics on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101," heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

After the critical success of 2014's "It Follows," writer-director David Robert Mitchell's next film was going to come with heightened expectations. "Under the Silver Lake" has been withheld from audiences for months now, and Nathan Weinbender takes a look at the L.A.-set noir, a bizarre mystery about hidden messages and conspiracy theories.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

Stephen King has never gone out of style. The bestselling horror writer's 1986 novel "It" became a hugely profitable film in 2017, and now his parable "Pet Sematary" is the subject of a new adaptation 30 years after an earlier big-screen effort. Nathan Weinbender is a fan of the original novel, and less enthusiastic about its 1989 adaptation, but is this new venture into the cursed graveyard worth a trip to the theater?

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