Nathan Weinbender

Movies 101 Co-Host

Nathan is an entertainment writer and film reviewer. He also produces stories and reviews for Spokane7.

"Captain Marvel was the subject of scrutiny and criticism before anyone had even seen it, mostly from Internet trolls who seemed to take issue with a woman in the lead role, a first for a Marvel film. It made a boatload of money anyway, but is it any good? Nathan Weinbender takes a look at the first bona fide blockbuster of 2019.

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101," heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

The Oscars were this weekend, and Netflix's "Roma" was a frontrunner in several categories. That's a shift from years past, when the streaming service's few eligible features were shut out, and more major filmmakers are opting for streaming over theatrical distribution. Nathan Weinbender takes a look at "High Flying Bird" and "Velvet Buzzsaw," two new Netflix releases that may or may not be the subject of awards consideration a year from now.

In the last 20 years, M. Night Shyamalan has gone from a box office phenom to a Hollywood laughing stock to a popular filmmaker again. It's been a wild ride, and his newest film "Glass" has topped the box office for the last three weeks. It links the worlds of Shyamalan's earlier films "Unbreakable" and "Split," but Nathan Weinbender says it feels more like a talky origin story than a grand finale.<br><br>

Nathan Weinbender is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101" heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

There are good movies, like those that are boring or artistically bankrupt or lazy. And then there are movies like "Serenity," which are so crazy you almost can't believe they exist, Nathan Weinbender says. Nathan is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a film critic on Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101," heard Friday evenings at 6:30 p.m. here on KPBX.  

There's no getting around it -- January is a lousy time of year for movies. It's been that way for a long time. The thriller "Escape Room" was the first wide release of 2019, and although it's hardly original, Nathan Weinbender says it's not as bad as this dark, cold month would suggest. But that's not to say it's good, exactly.

Nathan is the Film and Music Editor for the Inlander and a co-host of Spokane Public Radio's "Movies 101," heard Friday evenings at 6:30 here on KPBX.

2018 in Review

Jan 16, 2019

At the start of every new year, film critics love to reflect on the previous 12 months, and cobble together their requisite lists of favorites. Nathan Weinbender says 2018 offered an embarrassment of riches, and he runs down the best that cinema had to offer last year.

"Blindspotting," a commentary on gentrification, police brutality, and economic disparity starring and co-written by Daveed Diggs from "Hamilton," received acclaim at this year's Sundance Film Festival— but it completely bypassed Spokane theaters. Now that it's on DVD, Nathan Weinbender says it's an interesting debut film that's worth checking out.

"The Rider" is one of the best-reviewed films of the year with one of the most unusual backstories, and yet it barely played in Spokane— showing up on a single screen for only a week back in June. But now it's on DVD & Blu-ray, and it's a genuine marvel— blurring the line between reality and fiction in the true story of an injured rodeo rider trying to find his feet in the real world.

We all know that Melissa McCarthy is a comedic force to be reckoned with, but in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?" she delivers a rare dramatic performance as an unassuming literary forger. Nathan Weinbender takes a look at the new film, which is based on a true story, that's already getting Oscar buzz for its star.

It was only a matter of time until Queen, with its flamboyant frontman and roster of hits, got its own film. Now we have "Bohemian Rapsody," which follows the career of the band and the life of lead singer Freddie Mercury, using all those great old songs and a lot of biopic clichés. It may have been a box office champion, but Nathan Weinbender says he wasn't exactly rocked by the new film. 

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