Rachel Treisman

NPR will be covering and celebrating Latino culture and history throughout National Hispanic Heritage Month, which begins today.

You can find continued coverage here (and be sure to check out the "El Tiny" takeover of the Tiny Desk (home) concert series, kicking off with a performance from J Balvin).

Tributes are pouring in for Norm Macdonald, the Canadian comedian best known for anchoring Saturday Night Live's "Weekend Update" segments in the 1990s.

Macdonald died at 61 on Tuesday, nearly a decade after a cancer diagnosis that he kept private (here's a clip of a stand-up performance in which he derides the phrase "battling cancer").

MTV's Video Music Awards returned to the stage after 2020's socially distanced show. The show also marked the network's milestone 40th year.

It was a big night for Olivia Rodrigo, Justin Bieber and Lil Nas X, among others. Here are some of the memorable moments and "Moon person" winners.

Harvard University says it will end its investments in fossil fuels, a move that activists — both on and off campus — have been pushing the university to make for years.

Iconic American actress Jamie Lee Curtis has won the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the Venice International Film Festival.

Curtis accepted her award Wednesday just before the premiere of her new movie Halloween Kills, in which she reprises her longtime role as beloved protagonist Laurie Strode. The film, which comes out next month, is the sequel to 2018's Halloween and the 12th movie in the horror franchise.

Former Trump administration officials are pushing back after the Biden administration sought their removal from military academy boards.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is again under fire for his state's restrictive new abortion law, after falsely claiming it does not force victims of rape or incest to give birth even though it prohibits abortions after about six weeks — which is before many people even know they're pregnant.

Sprinter Keula Nidreia Pereira Semedo won't be leaving the Paralympics with a medal. But she will be coming home with a fiancé, after a surprise track-side proposal from her running partner, Manuel Antonio Vaz da Veiga.

While it initially looked like they would not be able to participate, Afghanistan's two Paralympic athletes have arrived in Tokyo and are set to compete in events this week.

Organizers had said Afghanistan's Paralympic team — represented by Taekwondo athlete Zakia Khudadadi and track athlete Hossain Rasouli — wouldn't be able to attend the Games because of the ongoing turmoil and lack of commercial flights in their home country.

Louisiana was already battling its fourth coronavirus surge — and worst one yet — when Ida struck. Here's what that means for hospitals, patients and those seeking shelter (and coronavirus tests):

Updated August 30, 2021 at 12:54 PM ET

Hundreds of thousands of people are without power in Louisiana and Mississippi, and outages could last for more than a month in parts of the region.

David Brown is known as the world's fastest completely blind runner. He was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease at 15 months old, which led him to completely lose his sight by age 13.

Brown says was "living in fear for a number of years" — until he discovered his passion for running. After winning an essay contest and attending the 2008 games in Beijing, he knew he wanted to compete himself.

Updated August 27, 2021 at 7:33 PM ET

Afghans and U.S. citizens continue to leave Afghanistan's capital in droves after the Taliban takeover and amid looming security threats. The U.S. is playing a role not only in mass evacuations but also in mass vaccination efforts, too.

One notable member of Team USA's delegation is Hunter Woodhall, a 22-year-old sprinter with two Paralympic medals under his belt already. He's also the first double amputee to earn a Division I track and field scholarship. But you may know him better as one half of a track and field power couple.

The Tokyo Paralympic Games are going to be more visible and have more participants than ever before, even in the face of the pandemic.

Here's a look at the records and other "firsts" happening in this year's Games, which officially opened on Tuesday and run through Sept. 5.

Sports for athletes with an impairment have existed for more than a century, the International Paralympic Committee points out.

But it wasn't until after World War II that the official Paralympics began to take shape, out of an effort to help the many veterans and civilians who were injured during that time.

German-British neurologist Dr. Ludwig Guttmann (who actually escaped from the Nazis) opened a spinal injuries center at the Stoke Mandeville Hospital in 1944 at the request of the British government.

The Tokyo Paralympic Games are officially underway, and will run until Sept. 5.

Hopefully you've gotten a glimpse of the opening ceremony — and if not, you can catch it again at 7 p.m. Tuesday on NBCSN, which will lead into live event coverage. All told, the Games will feature 539 events across 22 sports.

So what should you be tuning into over the next dozen days? Here's the full schedule, and a couple suggestions of events and athletes to watch:

What do the Paralympics have in common with the Olympic games? And what do either of them have to do with the Special Olympics?

Paralympic swimmer Anastasia Pagonis has the answers. The 17-year-old Long Island native has a whopping 2 million followers on TikTok, and uses her platform to educate others about visual impairment and Paralympic sport.

She breaks down some of the key differences between the Paralympics and Special Olympics here:

A school district in northeast Texas has found a creative way to get around Gov. Greg Abbott's ban on mask mandates.

The Paris Independent School District will now require students to wear masks as part of its dress code.

Updated August 18, 2021 at 12:12 PM ET

Ousted Afghan President Ashraf Ghani is now in the United Arab Emirates, the country confirmed in a brief statement on Wednesday.

"The UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation can confirm that the UAE has welcomed President Ashraf Ghani and his family into the country on humanitarian grounds," it wrote.

With all the developments in Afghanistan and Haiti, you may have missed this historic announcement out of Washington: The Biden administration has approved updates to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), giving families who currently receive food stamps the largest single increase in benefits to date.

Celebrities including tennis superstar Naomi Osaka are expressing their support for the Haitian people and calling on their fans to contribute to relief efforts.

Haiti — which is being drenched by a tropical storm — is still awaiting widespread assistance in the wake of the earthquake that killed more than 1,400 people and injured nearly 7,000.

Coronavirus news is coming fast and furious as the delta variant fuels another surge in cases across the United States.

Arkansas set a record for hospitalizations, while officials in one Florida county are urging residents to "consider other options" before calling 911. Health officials in Mississippi said the state's hospital system could collapse in five to 10 days if the current trajectory continues.

Two New York City comedy icons — and several of their famous friends — are holding a show to raise money for charities benefitting victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and their families.

Jon Stewart and Pete Davidson will host "NYC Still Rising After 20 Years: A Comedy Celebration" at Madison Square Garden on Sept. 12, a day after the attacks' 20th anniversary. The special aims to honor the city's resilience, the comedians said in a joint statement.

The United Nations just released its landmark climate report, urging countries to urgently cut their greenhouse gas emissions or else face catastrophic consequences.

So what exactly should the Biden administration do?

As COVID-19 cases surge, the federal government and some private employers are requiring their workers to show proof of vaccination. Plus, certain cities and localities are once again requiring masks indoors.

Some states, however, are not just ordering more precautions, but already moving to stop vaccination mandates in the future.

Looking to spend money on a single piece of 40-year-old cake from someone else's wedding?

Well, what if that wedding was the royal nuptials of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer?

South African swimmer Tatjana Schoenmaker stunned Olympic viewers with her historic win in the women's 200-meter breaststroke. But what happened next was equally sweet.

The 24-year-old claimed both a gold medal and a new world record Friday: 2:18.95. She's the first woman to swim the event in under 2 minutes, 19 seconds, a record set in 2013.

Heat waves. Floods. Wildfires. It's been a destructive summer so far, and forecasts for droughts, fires and hurricanes are looking downright bleak.

We know that climate change is to blame. But how exactly is global warming driving dangerous weather?

Lauren Sommer and Rebecca Hersher from NPR's climate team broke down the details in a conversation with Morning Edition's Noel King.

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