Chris Maccini


The State of Washington has sponsored an official poet laureate since 2007, but for the current poet laureate, Claudia Castro Luna, the past year has been unlike any other in state history. 

Rajah Bose


Jess Walter's new novel, The Cold Millions is set in Spokane during the labor disputes of the early 20th century. Hailed by The Philadelphia Inquirer as "A Scorsese-esque period piece, populated by cops, drunks, variety girls, temperance ladies, job sharks, Pinkertons, and Wobblies” The novel follows two adventure seeking brothers, the wealthy enemies who threaten them, and the women who reveal to them an unjust world on the brink of upheaval.

Jess Walter lives in his hometown, Spokane, and he joined SPR's Chris Maccini to talk about the new novel.

keepmusiclivewa.com

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all types of businesses, but perhaps none more significantly than live music venues, which have remained closed throughout Washington since March 15th. A new statewide effort is looking to help those businesses pay their bills.

Vanessa Veselka. She is the author of the novel Zazen, which won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. Her new novel is The Great Offshore Grounds, a sweeping story of a family drama tackling social status, death, love, femininity, American greed and mythology, the current state of the US healthcare system, sky-high rents, and the struggle to get by.

leynakrow.com

 


It’s not often that a short story, written by a local author and first published in a local anthology gets optioned by a Hollywood production company to be made into a feature film. But that’s just what’s happened to Spokane author Leyna Krow.

 

As coronavirus restrictions continue, more and more organizations are getting used to moving events online. This Friday, July 31st, Terrain, the nonprofit arts organization in Spokane, is hosting a virtual gallery show titled, “Express Yourself.” The live event is the culmination of a month-long project to showcase the work of artists of color in the Inland Northwest.

 

A new mural is being painted this summer on the 100 North block alley between Howard and Wall streets in downtown Spokane. Jiemei Lin is a Pullman, Washington-based artist and graphic designer, originally from China. Her new mural consists of two panels, each showing a child diving into a swimming pool. One scene takes place at night and the other during a bright summer day. The design is meant to celebrate global connections.

Twenty-four year-old Carter Hudson is a musician and songwriter known during non-COVID times for his weekly performances at The Drinkery, a bar located in Spokane’s historic Garland District. His submission to this year’s NPR Tiny Desk Contest is an intimately shot video featuring Hudson alone in his bedroom, surrounded by guitars. The lyrics to the song, titled “I Can’t Hear You Anymore,” are personal.

Last week, we brought you the story of Coeur d’Alene musician Jackson Roltgen and his submission to this year’s NPR Tiny Desk Contest. This week, Spokane Public Radio’s Chris Maccini talks with another young musician, this time from Spokane, who also submitted a video for the national contest.

Watch Carter Hudson's full YouTube video submission here.

Each year since 2014, NPR has invited musicians from around the country to submit video performances of original songs for its Tiny Desk Contest. It’s an offshoot of the popular Tiny Desk Concert video series in which well known and obscure musicians perform at Bob Boilen’s desk at NPR headquarters. 

Quinn Russell Brown


    

  

Small businesses across the country have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, as have artists and musicians. A virtual event this Saturday [today] is bringing the two together with big name musical acts supporting communities across the country, including here in the Inland Northwest.

Spokane Poetry Slam

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many events to move online, and the Spokane Poetry Slam is no exception. They’ve been hosting their monthly event online since March. But this Thursday, in light of the ongoing Black Lives Matter protests in Spokane and around the world, they’re hosting a special open mic, virtually of course.

Katie Patterson Larson

It’s graduation time for Spokane area schools. But with in person events such as graduation ceremonies and prom cancelled, the community is finding new ways to celebrate this year.

Brooke Matson is a poet and book artist in Spokane, Washington, where she is the executive director of Spark Central, a non-profit dedicated to igniting creativity, innovation, and imagination. Eight years of teaching and mentoring at-risk youth deepened her study of physical science and the psychological effects of violence and loss. 

Matson's second collection of poetry, In Accelerated Silence, was selected by Mark Doty as winner of the Jake Adam York Prize and has just been published by Milkweed Editions. 

photo by Grace June (2019)

Erin Pringle is the author of a novel, Hezada! I Miss You (forthcoming Awst Press, 2020) and two short story collections, The Whole World at Once (West Virginia University Press/Vandalia Press 2017) and The Floating Order (Two Ravens Press, 2009). She has written three chapbooks: "How The Sun Burns Among Hills of Rock and Pebble" (The Head and The Hand Press, Philadelphia/2015); "The Lightning Tree" (Underground Voices, 2015); and "The Wandering House" (Awst Press, Austin/2016).

Keelin Elizabeth Photography


  Many high schoolers compete in sports, and others square off in debate or knowledge bowl. But each year, the Downtown Spokane Public Library and Spokane Arts host a more unusual competition for high school students.

Cameron McGill is a poet, educator, and musician living in Moscow, ID. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Sonora Review, RHINO, Western Humanities Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook, Meridians, will be published on February 1 by Willow Springs Books. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Idaho and teaches at Washington State University, where he serves as poetry editor of Blood Orange Review and co-director of the Visiting Writer Series. His work lives at cameronmcgill.com.

Chris Maccini

For nearly ten years, Spokane Youth Ballet (SYB) has provided performance opportunities to dance students in the Spokane area by producing professional-level ballets starring local dancers. With SAGA support, SYB will be expanding its mission of promoting the art of dance by taking ballet into local schools.

Beginning Monday, January 13, 2020 and showing monthly through Monday, June 8, The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture -hosts a series of award-winning independent documentary films at the Magic Lantern in downtown Spokane. All films begin at 7PM and are followed by a discussion or panel with the audience and special guests. Tickets are $8.

Christopher Boucher is the author of the widely praised novels Golden Delicious and How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive. Boucher teaches literature and writing at Boston college and is editor the literary magazine Post Road. He was in Spokane as part of Eastern Washington University Visiting Writers Series.

Dean Davis

Christopher Howell is the author of twelve collections of poetry including Love’s Last Number, Gaze, and most recently, The Grief of a Happy Life, just released by University of Washington Press. Howell has received numerous awards including the Washington State Governor’s Award, the Washington State Book Award, two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and three Pushcart Prizes. Locally, he is known as a faculty member in Eastern Washington University’s Master of Fine Arts program as well as director of Willow Springs Books and Lynx House Press.

Gordon S. Jackson, is the author of the new novel, Never Say Moist at Wyndover College. Jackson taught journalism at Whitworth University for more than 30 years. He grew up in South Africa during the apartheid era, encountering the sensorship that subsequently promted him to promote free expression in the classroom and in his writing. Never Say Moist at Wyndover College is Jackson’s fourteenth book, and his second novel. 

Scott Davis | Faces of Valor

As Veteran’s Day approaches, many of us take time to honor family members and previous generations who have served in the Armed Forces. But for Gonzaga University student, Scott Davis, a childhood fascination has become an all-consuming passion to document the first-hand stories of World War II veterans.

orphanwisdom.com

Stephen Jenkinson is an activist, teacher, author, social worker, farmer, and founder of the Orphan Wisdom School. He is also the host of A Night of Grief & Mystery, a musical, poetic, ceremonial evening which he describes as “devoted to the ragged mysteries of being human.” The tour will be in Spokane on Wednesday, November 13th, 7 p.m. at the Bing Crosby Theater. Jenkinson joined Chris Maccini via phone to talk about his work and upcoming performance.

Dean Davis

Spokane Arts announced earlier this month that Spokane’s next Poet Laureate will be Chris Cook. Cook and outgoing Poet Laureate, Mark Anderson, talk with SPR's Chris Maccini.

Timothy Egan is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of nine books including The Big Burn, Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher, The Immortal Irishman, and The Worst Hard Time, which won the 2006 National Book Award for non-fiction. His new book, A Pilgrimage to Eternity: From Canterbury to Rome in Search of a Faith, follows Egan on a personal journey of more than 1000 miles as he considers his own faith and traces the history of Christianity in Europe along the way.

The Bartlett | Facebook

  


Since its opening in 2013, The Bartlett has been one of the go-to venues for live music and arts events in Spokane, especially for local, up-and-coming acts. But in September, owners Caleb and Karli Ingersoll announced in a Facebook post that The Bartlett would be closing later this fall.

The announcement was a surprise for most followers of the Spokane music scene, but owner Karli Ingersoll says it’s something she and her husband have been considering for a while.

TEDx Spokane will take place on Saturday, October 26th, beginning at 9 a.m. at the Bing Crosby Theater in downtown Spokane. This year's event will feature educators, authors, poets, morticians, community advocates, non-profit administrators, and more. 

Event founder Jaime Tender talked with SPR's Chris Maccini about the origins of the event, and two of this year's performers, Spokane Poet Laureate Mark Anderson, and musician Karli Ingersoll gave a preview of their TED Talks.

Tickets and details about the event can be found at TEDxSpokane.com.

Kathryn Smith's new chapbook, Chosen Companions of the Goblin, won the 2018 Open Country Chapbook Contest. It is inspired by the real-life story of the Fox Sisters, who claimed to be spiritual mediums and helped spark the spiritualist movment in 19th century America. 

She will be hosting a release party for the book, on Friday, October 25, 7 p.m. at the Woman's Club of Spokane, 1428 W 9th Ave.


Madeline Miller’s novel Circe is this year’s selection for “Spokane Is Reading” a collaboration between The Spokane Public Library, Spokane County Libraries and Auntie’s Bookstore.

 

The book is a re-imagining of the story of a greek goddess, banished from her godly peers who discovers the power of witchcraft among the world of mortals and becomes a powerful sorceress.

 

Madeline MIller will be in town for two Spokane is reading events on Thursday, October 24th. 1 p.m. at the Spokane Valley Event Center and 7 p.m. at the Downtown Spokane Public Library. Details at SpokaneIsReading.org

 

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